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Cover for Raman correlation spectroscopy : a feasibility study of a new optical correlation
      technique and development of multi-component nanoparticles using the reprecipitation
      method
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-10T16:25:33Zen
dc.date.available2012-02-10T16:25:33Zen
dc.date.created2011en
dc.date.issueden
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_553203.tar;APT-ETAG: 3fc5554b5e8117a842d845f8fa4867e0en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Georgetown University, 2011.; Includes bibliographical references.; Text (Electronic thesis) in PDF format. The feasibility of Raman correlation spectroscopy (RCS) is investigated as a new temporal optical fluctuation spectroscopy in this dissertation. RCS analyzes the correlations of the intensity fluctuations of Raman scattering from particles in a suspension that undergo Brownian motion. Because each Raman emission line arises from a specific molecular bond, the RCS method could yield diffusion behavior of specific chemical species within a dispersion. Due to the nature of Raman scattering as a coherent process, RCS could provide similar information as acquired in dynamic light scattering (DLS) and be practical for various applications that requires the chemical specificity in dynamical information. The theoretical development is discussed, and four experimental implementations of this technique are explained. The autocorrelation of the intensity fluctuations from a β-carotene solution is obtained using the some configurations; however, the difficulty in precise alignment and weak nature of Raman scattering prevented the achievement of high sensitivity and resolution. Possible fluctuations of the phase of Raman scattering could also be affecting the results. A possible explanation of the observed autocorrelation in terms of number fluctuations of particles is also examined to test the feasibility of RCS as a new optical characterization method.; In order to investigate the complex systems for which RCS would be useful, strategies for the creation of a multicomponent nanoparticle system are also explored. Using regular solution theory along with the concept of Hansen solubility parameters, an analytical model is developed to predict whether two or more components will form single nanoparticles, and what effect various processing conditions would have. The reprecipitation method was used to demonstrate the formation of the multi-component system of the charge transfer complex perylene:TCNQ (tetracyanoquinodimethane) and the active pharmaceutical ingredient cocrystal of CBZ:NCT (carbamazepine:nicotinamide). The experimental results with various characterization methods including DLS, absorption spectroscopy, powder x-ray diffraction, and SEM imaging, verify formation of the multicomponent cocrystals. The observation of the self-assembly of TCNQ crystals is also discussed.en
dc.formatapplication/pdfen
dc.languageengen
dc.publisherGeorgetown Universityen
dc.sourceDept. of Physics, Doctoral dissertations, 2011.en
dc.subjectPhysics; Opticsen
dc.titleRaman correlation spectroscopy : a feasibility study of a new optical correlation technique and development of multi-component nanoparticles using the reprecipitation methoden
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