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Notre Dame Cathedral Grotesque Le Stryge
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-08T16:57:23Zen
dc.date.available2012-03-08T16:57:23Zen
dc.date.created1981en
dc.date.issueden
dc.identifier.otherCioffi 2-132en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_554232.tar;APT-ETAG: aa8b9f812afd76773835de84eecd9598; APT-DATE: 2017-02-21_13:33:04en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionThis grotesque, located on an angle along the gallery of the north tower of Notre-Dame, is one of a group of fantastical figures carved during the 19th C. restoration of the cathedral. This restoration was carried out between 1843-64 under the direction of Eugène-Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc (with Jean-Baptiste Lassus, until his death in 1857), chief architect for the Commission de monuments historique , France's agency for national preservation at the time. By the mid-19th C., the medieval gargoyles that had protectively spouted water away from the building had deteriorated. Inspired by Victor Hugo's 1831 book Notre-Dame de Paris (English: Hunchback of Notre Dame), Viollet-le-Duc replaced the gargoyles with chimères, as he called them, guardian-demons that, from an architectural viewpoint, are simply decorative. An 1852-54 series of etchings on Paris by artist Charles Meryon featured an image of the grotesque pictured here. Meryon showed it overlooking the city below; he named the print Le Stryge (The Vampire), and catapulted the stone carving to fame.en
dc.formatImage/jpegen
dc.relationThe Rev. Paul L. Cioffi, S.J. Images Collection;en
dc.rightsFor more information about re-use and reproduction of this image, please refer to: http://www.georgetown.edu/copyright-information/en
dc.subjectSculpture Grotesquesen
dc.titleNotre Dame Cathedral Grotesque Le Strygeen
dc.coverageParis, France Restoration (process)en


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