Show simple item record

Files in this item

Timgad Church Site, Exterior View of Apse Looking Northwest Toward Baptistery
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-08T16:57:30Zen
dc.date.available2012-03-08T16:57:30Zen
dc.date.created1983-06en
dc.date.issueden
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_554348.tar;APT-ETAG: 3ac1815222321aa23479be9c32b8ec9a; APT-DATE: 2017-02-21_12:03:03en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionIn 100 C.E. the Roman Emperor Trajan founded Timgad (Thamugadi) in the Aures Mountains of North Africa (near present-day Batna, Algeria) as a military colony for retired personnel. After suffering invasions by the Vandals and Berbers, the city was not rebuilt after the 7th C.; it was excavated in 1881. The Roman city center, where Christian church buildings were eventually erected, was neatly laid out in a grid pattern and built of stone and masonry in the Corinthian style. Timgad's orthodox Christian heritage dates from the 3rd C. (from the 4th C. the city was also a center for Donatists). The orthodox Christian Church was situated near the city library and the house of Januarius. Its baptistery is incorporated within the walls of the church. ca. June 1983en
dc.relationThe Rev. Paul L. Cioffi, S.J. Images Collectionen
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectChurch buildingsen
dc.subjectArchaeological sitesen
dc.subjectChurches;en
dc.titleTimgad Church Site, Exterior View of Apse Looking Northwest Toward Baptisteryen
dc.coverageThamugadi (Extinct city), Algeria, Early Christianen
dc.contributor.repositoryDigital Georgetown
dc.rights.noteFor more information about copyright for materials within DigitalGeorgetown, please consult https://www.library.georgetown.edu/copyright/digitalgeorgetown.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record