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dc.contributor.advisorThomas, Adamen
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-02T18:45:32Zen
dc.date.available2013-05-02T18:45:32Zen
dc.date.created2012en
dc.date.issueden
dc.date.submitted01/01/2012en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_557770.tar;APT-ETAG: 5029906d735421835fd1ed85e1eb7122; APT-DATE: 2017-02-16_10:23:58en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionM.P.P.en
dc.description.abstractBUYING DOWN OUR CARBON FOOTPRINT:en
dc.description.abstractAN ECONOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF GREEN PRICING PROGRAMS ON ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION IN THE U.S. RESIDENTIAL SECTORen
dc.description.abstractAnna J. Lising, B.A.en
dc.description.abstractThesis Advisor: Adam Thomas, Ph.D.en
dc.description.abstractABSTRACTen
dc.description.abstractRising global temperatures caused by carbon dioxide emissions have created a multitude of environmental and health risks worldwide. Many state governments have rallied around green pricing programs for their potential to incentivize energy conservation and reduce CO2 emissions by requiring utilities to make green pricing programs available to their customers. Green pricing programs (GPP) have the potential to reduce energy consumption in the residential sector, which accounts for approximately 21 percent of the total energy consumption in the United States. GPPs also could potentially reduce building-related energy consumption, which is associated with approximately one-third of global energy consumption and one-third of total energy-related carbon emissions. This begs the question of whether Congress should pass legislation mandating that all utilities offer green pricing programs.en
dc.description.abstractEmploying state- and time-fixed effects regression, the results of this analysis show that participation in green pricing programs has a statistically significant negative correlation with residential electricity consumption rates. This indicates a potential for green pricing programs to reduce electricity consumption, thereby decreasing the negative environmental impacts associated with generating electricity. However, results also indicate that a substantial jump in GPP participation rates is needed to realize even relatively small reductions in electricity consumption. Although the level of effort required to achieve energy savings through GPPs may deter public officials from mandating the availability of green pricing programs for all utility customers, GPPs should not be excluded outright when considering viable policy options for reducing electricity consumption. Further research and analysis can identify program features to improve GPP participation rates, as well as finding ways to strengthen program efficacy in delivering greater energy savings.en
dc.formatPDFen
dc.format.extent53 leavesen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherGeorgetown Universityen
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciencesen
dc.sourcePublic Policy & Policy Managementen
dc.subjectcarbon emissionsen
dc.subjectclimate changeen
dc.subjectelectricity consumptionen
dc.subjectelectricity priceen
dc.subjectenergy consumptionen
dc.subjectgreen pricing programen
dc.subject.lcshPower resourcesen
dc.subject.lcshPublic policyen
dc.subject.otherEnergyen
dc.subject.otherPublic policyen
dc.titleBuying Down Our Carbon Footprint: An Econometric Analysis of the Impact of Green Pricing Programs on Electricity Consumption in the U.S. Residential Sectoren
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