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Cover for Is China's Outward FDI Politically Driven?
dc.contributor.advisorHall, Gillette Hen
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-02T18:45:41Zen
dc.date.available2013-05-02T18:45:41Zen
dc.date.created2012en
dc.date.issueden
dc.date.submitted01/01/2012en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_557882.tar;APT-ETAG: ad8590edb50d06ae9ab5b67fd8a41ad8; APT-DATE: 2017-02-14_14:43:29en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionM.P.P.en
dc.description.abstractTo capture the invisible political considerations underlying China's outward foreign direct investment in the new millennium, this study embeds a new component - the bilateral diplomatic relationship, into the traditional FDI empirical framework. Rigorous evidence unveils the fact that Chinese government is influential not only in encouraging, but also in shaping China's outbound investments through directing the investments to countries having more friendly diplomatic relationship with the country. Meanwhile, market-access and resource-seeking motives are proved to be strong drivers as well. These empirical results support the economic diplomacy argument that the new type of diplomacy under current context of globalization, no longer fully relies on political considerations, but also takes country's economic benefits into account, as China's outward FDI tried to balance both economic and political interests.en
dc.formatPDFen
dc.format.extent35 leavesen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherGeorgetown Universityen
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciencesen
dc.sourcePublic Policy & Policy Managementen
dc.subject.lcshPublic policyen
dc.subject.otherPublic policyen
dc.titleIs China's Outward FDI Politically Driven?en
dc.typethesisen


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