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Cover for The Motherhood Wage Penalty: The Role of Occupation & Postponing Pregnancy
dc.contributor.advisorWei, Thomasen
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-02T18:45:42Zen
dc.date.available2013-05-02T18:45:42Zen
dc.date.created2012en
dc.date.issueden
dc.date.submitted01/01/2012en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_557887.tar;APT-ETAG: df802269ad5083bc80e9b5d408329304; APT-DATE: 2017-02-14_13:54:20en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionM.P.P.en
dc.description.abstractPrior studies demonstrate the existence of a wage penalty for mothers versus women who never have children. This study uses data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to investigate whether women who become mothers early in their careers experience a different motherhood wage penalty than women who become mothers late in their careers, as well as whether this relationship varies by occupation. The results of the analysis support the hypothesis that women who become mothers late in their careers suffer less of the motherhood wage penalty than women who become mothers early in their careers. Furthermore, I find that this effect varies by industry. Not only do the study's results support the claim of previous researchers that mothers earn less than their non-mother counterparts, but it also suggests that by postponing pregnancy women will experience less of this effect than their early mother counterparts.en
dc.formatPDFen
dc.format.extent35 leavesen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherGeorgetown Universityen
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciencesen
dc.sourcePublic Policy & Policy Managementen
dc.subjectMotherhooden
dc.subjectMother Wageen
dc.subjectWage Penaltyen
dc.subject.lcshPublic policyen
dc.subject.otherPublic policyen
dc.titleThe Motherhood Wage Penalty: The Role of Occupation & Postponing Pregnancyen
dc.typethesisen


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