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Cover for Aid to Education and Terrorism: Exploring Unintended Consequences
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dc.contributor.advisorKern, Andreasen
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-02T18:45:43Zen
dc.date.available2013-05-02T18:45:43Zen
dc.date.created2012en
dc.date.issueden
dc.date.submitted01/01/2012en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_557895.tar;APT-ETAG: f69dd20ac57541a38ed795a17ffea40a; APT-DATE: 2017-02-17_16:23:12en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionM.P.P.en
dc.description.abstractTerrorism has proven itself to be one of the most tenacious threats of the modern world, in part because it is difficult to predict and because its root causes are poorly understood. In spite of the popular conception of the terrorist as an insane, impoverished radical, political scientists suggest that terrorists are typically established, educated, and well-off. Economists, operating from a macroeconomic perspective, suggest that terrorism occurs in countries where opportunities are few, incomes are extremely unequal, and political systems are closed - in short, when there are few educated, middle-class elites. This contradiction is problematic, especially for those who seek to undermine terrorism through nation-building and international development. If terrorism is perpetrated by educated elites, then do we risk creating more terrorists when we improve the educational systems of impoverished societies? Or does a broader middle class create socialization effects that de-radicalize potential terrorists? Answering these questions has important implications for development funding, counter-terrorism, and international stability and security. In this thesis, I investigate this relationship empirically using time- and country-fixed effects panel regressions. My results suggest a negative relationship between terrorism and educational aid, but are not methodologically strong enough to posit a causal relationship.en
dc.formatPDFen
dc.format.extent43 leavesen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherGeorgetown Universityen
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciencesen
dc.sourcePublic Policy & Policy Managementen
dc.subjectaiden
dc.subjectcounterterrorismen
dc.subjectdevelopmenten
dc.subjecteducationen
dc.subjectterrorismen
dc.subject.lcshPublic policyen
dc.subject.otherPublic policyen
dc.titleAid to Education and Terrorism: Exploring Unintended Consequencesen
dc.typethesisen


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