Show simple item record

Files in this item

Cover for THE SPRAY CAN IS MIGHTIER THAN THE SWORD: STREET ART AS A MEDIUM FOR POLITICAL DISCOURSE IN THE POST-SOVIET REGION
dc.contributor.advisorBalzer, Harleyen
dc.contributor.advisorHilton, Alison Len
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-02T18:57:06Zen
dc.date.available2013-05-02T18:57:06Zen
dc.date.created2012en
dc.date.issueden
dc.date.submitted01/01/2012en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_557900.tar;APT-ETAG: 9cd85abb6342c40468274ffc09ce1f4fen
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionM.A.en
dc.description.abstractIn authoritarian states, opposition movements and members of civil society lack unrestricted and uncensored access to the mainstream media and subsequently to the public sphere. As a result, those wishing to express their political sentiment or influence public discourse are forced to seek out alternative avenues of expression. An anonymous and untraceable art, graffiti freely criticizes everything that the mainstream media does not and perhaps cannot. Graffiti reclaims the corporate-dominated public space as a place for sharing banned information, promoting ignored causes, discussing society's ills, and even mobilizing the public for a certain aim. An art of satirical discourse, graffiti anonymously communicates the frank narrative of a city, uninhibited by official censors. This research project analyzes contemporary graffiti not only as a popular public aesthetic, but also as a mouthpiece of political sentiment. This paper explores the use of graffiti and street art within the post-Soviet region and post-Communist Europe. In particular it explores and compares the street narrative of politicized or authoritarian Minsk, Budapest, Saint Petersburg, and Moscow, four cities where graffiti and street art offer a voice to the voiceless and a medium for the politically suffocated. This is the first formal comparative study of how graffiti is used as a political tool in the post-Soviet region.en
dc.formatPDFen
dc.format.extent136 leavesen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherGeorgetown Universityen
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciencesen
dc.sourceRussian & East European Studiesen
dc.subjectBelarusen
dc.subjectGraffitien
dc.subjectHungaryen
dc.subjectPolitical Expressionen
dc.subjectRussiaen
dc.subjectStreet Arten
dc.subject.lcshEurope, Eastern; Researchen
dc.subject.lcshRussia; Historyen
dc.subject.lcshPolitical Scienceen
dc.subject.otherEast European studiesen
dc.subject.otherRussian historyen
dc.subject.otherPolitical Scienceen
dc.titleTHE SPRAY CAN IS MIGHTIER THAN THE SWORD: STREET ART AS A MEDIUM FOR POLITICAL DISCOURSE IN THE POST-SOVIET REGIONen
dc.typethesisen


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record