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Cover for TERRORISM IN YEMEN: CHALLENGES AND UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICY
dc.contributor.advisorPalarino, R. Nicholasen
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-11T17:39:07Zen
dc.date.available2013-06-11T17:39:07Zen
dc.date.created2013en
dc.date.issueden
dc.date.submitted01/01/2013en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_558552.tar;APT-ETAG: 019314f53027d8ce92789f2dc2846f99; APT-DATE: 2017-02-14_16:43:16en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionM.A.L.S.en
dc.description.abstractTERRORISM IN YEMEN: CHALLENGES AND UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICYen
dc.description.abstractYasmine A. Ben Gabr, B.A.en
dc.description.abstractMentor: Professor R. Nicholas Palarino, Ph.D.en
dc.description.abstractABSTRACTen
dc.description.abstractWhile the legacy of the Arab Spring is still not definitely determined, one thing that can be said with near certainty is that it has further destabilized the Middle East, including Yemen. Many U.S. administration officials have declared that the Yemeni-based terrorist organization AQAP (Al Qaeda in the Arab Peninsula) is the most lethal of the Al Qaeda affiliates to U.S. security and interests. In recent years, the U.S. administration has supported an increased U.S. commitment of resources to "counterterrorism" efforts in the country, including both covert and overt actions. The U.S. has increased its use of drone strikes but has not balanced the scale by focusing sufficient efforts on building the economic or social foundation, or on winning the support of the populace.en
dc.description.abstractToday, the country has to contend with major issues such as tribal unrest, tensions between the north and south, a disintegrating economy, widespread unemployment, rampant corruption, and rapid resource depletion, particularly with regard to oil and clean water, which have posed tremendous security challenges to the current administration. A policy centered on counterterrorism to the exclusion of Yemen's other problems may eventually prove counterproductive.en
dc.description.abstractYemeni citizens should be informed and included in development projects, in consideration of the fact that the country is not a proxy battleground and that our long-term commitment to its stability, development, and legitimacy matches our more immediate and urgent commitment to the defeat of AQAP. Our strategy must not be to create new problems by eliminating old ones. A tarnished American image will only augment the cause of hostile groups in the long term.en
dc.description.abstractA sustainable, workable, and long-term solution in Yemen entails reversing Washington's policy of fighting terrorism with air raids, killings, and covert operations. Rather, grassroots and economic strategies may pave the way for a brighter future for Yemen and lead to the repression of terrorist activities and protection of U.S. interests in that region. The extent to which the situation in Yemen continues to deteriorate has yet to be seen and is in some ways contingent on U.S. efforts in the country.en
dc.formatPDFen
dc.format.extent93 leavesen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherGeorgetown Universityen
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciencesen
dc.sourcePublic Policy & Policy Managementen
dc.subjectCounterterrorismen
dc.subjectDroneen
dc.subjectForeign Policyen
dc.subjectTerrorismen
dc.subjectYemenen
dc.subject.lcshPublic policyen
dc.subject.lcshInternational relationsen
dc.subject.lcshMiddle East; Researchen
dc.subject.otherPublic policyen
dc.subject.otherInternational relationsen
dc.subject.otherMiddle Eastern studiesen
dc.titleTERRORISM IN YEMEN: CHALLENGES AND UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICYen
dc.typethesisen
gu.embargo.lift-date9999en


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