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Cover for MODELING SPANISH MOOD CHOICE IN BELIEF STATEMENTS
dc.contributor.advisorKatz, Grahamen
dc.contributor.advisorSingh, Lisaen
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-11T18:04:03Zen
dc.date.available2013-06-11T18:04:03Zen
dc.date.created2013en
dc.date.issueden
dc.date.submitted01/01/2013en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_558679.tar;APT-ETAG: 1141397dd4ff3f15406463f760645c48en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionPh.D.en
dc.description.abstractThis work develops a computational methodology new to linguistics that empirically evaluates competing linguistic theories on Spanish verbal mood choice through the use of computational techniques to learn mood and other hidden linguistic features from Spanish belief statements found in corpora. The machine learned probabilistic linguistic models are then evaluated in terms of mood prediction for sentences such as (1):en
dc.description.abstract(1) No creo que Juan es / sea alto.en
dc.description.abstractI don't believe that Juan is.Indicative / is.Subjunctive tallen
dc.description.abstractMost native speakers note subtle differences in meaning between the indicative and subjunctive versions. While there is abundant research on subjunctive licensors (see Portner 1999, 2011), and whether the same licensing property is universally applicable to all subjunctive contexts there is little work to explain what the Spanish mood morpheme contributes to the overall meaning. Villalta (2007, 2010) proposes gradability as being a key linguistic feature that licenses mood in Spanish.en
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation extends her theory into a broader semantic process. This theory and other competing semantic theories were translated into probabilistic graphical models (see Koller & Friedman 2011). Large amounts of relevant text were collected, formatted, statistically summarized and ranked, yielding rich analysis of the Spanish mood choice problem. Then the models were trained on the data through common data sampling techniques so that the probabilities of the hidden linguistic features could be computationally learned. The resultant probabilistic models for each linguistic theory then predicted mood in 6,282 sentences.en
dc.description.abstractMultiple models achieved accuracy scores between 80% and 84%. The extended Villalta model did significantly outscore the regular Villalta model, but did not significantly outscore three other semantic models. Nevertheless, this model was also shown to accurately predict scalar implicatures and metalinguistic negation. With a sentence like (1), the model predicted wether Juan was short, almost tall, just plain tall or very tall 69% of the time. When the set of these four alternatives was reduced to three (not tall, just plain tall and very tall) the accuracy was 81%, suggesting an innovative application of theoretical linguistics to Opinion Mining (cf Liu 2012) efforts.en
dc.formatPDFen
dc.format.extent292 leavesen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherGeorgetown Universityen
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciencesen
dc.sourceSpanish & Portugueseen
dc.subjectcamputational semanticsen
dc.subjectepistemic modelingen
dc.subjectprobabilistic linguistic theoryen
dc.subjectSpanish mooden
dc.subject.lcshLinguisticsen
dc.subject.lcshComputer scienceen
dc.subject.otherLinguisticsen
dc.subject.otherComputer scienceen
dc.titleMODELING SPANISH MOOD CHOICE IN BELIEF STATEMENTSen
dc.typethesisen


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