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Cover for Kenya's 2013 Presidential Election: A Qualified Success
dc.contributor.advisorHoffman, Baraken
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-15T16:01:19Zen
dc.date.available2014-08-15T16:01:19Zen
dc.date.created2013en
dc.date.issueden
dc.date.submitted01/01/2013en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_709812.tar;APT-ETAG: d60c0a7d32c343d4d9f9826a70986068; APT-DATE: 2017-02-13_12:13:24en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionM.A.L.S.en
dc.description.abstractMany international observers billed Kenya's 2013 presidential election a success for its lack of political violence. This assessment is valid when basing success against the numbers of dead and displaced following the country's disputed 2007 presidential election. However, even though they failed to surface in the 2013 election, much of the underlying political and ethnic tensions that drove the violence in 2007 are still prevalent today. These issues include weak political coalitions, ethnicity based political parties, land access, and clientelism. Contrasting the historical framework of the above issues against recent field analyses, research from commissioned investigative bodies, and local media reporting reaffirms that the tensions still exists; and, if not addressed may cause a repeat of Kenya's 2007 post-election violence in the country's subsequent election.en
dc.formatPDFen
dc.format.extent98 leavesen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherGeorgetown Universityen
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciencesen
dc.sourceLiberal Studiesen
dc.subjectAfricaen
dc.subjectelectionsen
dc.subjectJubilee Coalitionen
dc.subjectKenyaen
dc.subjectpolitical violenceen
dc.subject.lcshAfrica; Researchen
dc.subject.lcshInternational relationsen
dc.subject.otherAfrican studiesen
dc.subject.otherInternational relationsen
dc.titleKenya's 2013 Presidential Election: A Qualified Successen
dc.typethesisen


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