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Cover for Educational Resilience in Children from Immigrant Families: The Protective Role of Culture and Self-Regulation
dc.contributor.advisorMoghaddam, Fathali M.en
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-15T16:32:32Zen
dc.date.available2014-08-15T16:32:32Zen
dc.date.created2014en
dc.date.issueden
dc.date.submitted01/01/2014en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_709847.tar;APT-ETAG: 5c6d82e91ba589ada01066c3807cbb46en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionPh.D.en
dc.description.abstractA growing literature on children's developmental outcomes indicates that children from immigrant families enjoy academic and behavioral advantages over their native-born co-ethnic peers. Aided by the release of rigorous, nationally representative studies like the federally funded Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten cohort (ECLS-K), researchers are able to draw conclusions that generalize to the entire population of immigrant children in the United States. Despite the value of these data, research using these studies has not kept pace with theoretical and empirical work on acculturation. This is problematic because acculturation--the psychological changes that occur with respect to both host and heritage culture as a result of intercultural contact--plays a large role in many popular and scholarly explanations for declining outcomes over generations. To address this limitation, this dissertation addresses three objectives: (1) To expand how acculturation is conceptualized and assessed in one such study (ECLS-K), (2) To explore how different dimensions of acculturation might influence self-regulatory classroom behaviors over time, and (3) To investigate how acculturation and classroom behavior together may give rise to different patterns of academic achievement.en
dc.description.abstractFindings suggest that language skills reflecting particular acculturation strategies (e.g. English proficiency, fluency in a non-English language) predict better academic performance in fifth grade as well as better approaches to learning (ATL), a suite of self-regulatory behaviors that children display during learning activities, throughout elementary school. However, participating in cultural events and discussions had no effect on these classroom behaviors. To the extent that the two can be separated, this research suggests that bilingualism rather than maintenance of cultural practices supports positive classroom behaviors, which in turn predicts academic achievement.en
dc.formatPDFen
dc.format.extent130 leavesen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherGeorgetown Universityen
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciencesen
dc.sourcePsychologyen
dc.subjectapproaches to learningen
dc.subjectbilingualismen
dc.subjectearly childhooden
dc.subjectimmigrant childrenen
dc.subject.lcshPsychologyen
dc.subject.otherPsychologyen
dc.titleEducational Resilience in Children from Immigrant Families: The Protective Role of Culture and Self-Regulationen
dc.typethesisen


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