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Cover for Why Americans are Driving Less?
dc.contributor.advisorKern, Andreas Thomasen
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-15T16:35:56Zen
dc.date.available2014-08-15T16:35:56Zen
dc.date.created2014en
dc.date.issueden
dc.date.submitted01/01/2014en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_709876.tar;APT-ETAG: 641e4d3fcf8fc866cdee944095274bcd; APT-DATE: 2017-02-16_15:34:03en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionM.P.P.en
dc.description.abstractSince 2007 car ridership in the US has been declining at a rate of over 93 million miles per year. Taking population growth (0.07 percent) into consideration, this development raises questions about the future of automobile dependence in America (Puentes, 2012). Several studies identify the influence of changing lifestyle attitudes and increased use of information technologyen
dc.description.abstractas reasons behind this drop in per capita travel. Yet little research has focused on the possible association between age, telecommunications and annual mileage. This thesis looks aten
dc.description.abstractdifferences in driving trends between different generations and their potential implications for overall American transportation services and the US economy. In particular the paper addresses the question whether age, belonging to the millennial generation, leads to a drop in miles driven. Using National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) data from 2009, I examine the relationship between different generations and annual mileage. I hypothesize that changes in the habits of the younger population is primarily driving the drop in car ridership. I find that Internet use has no significant relationship with car ridership, there is a statistically significant negative relationshipen
dc.description.abstractbetween the millennial generation and car ridership. Due to the auto dependence evident in American society, this reduction in driving for the millennial generation could not only affect road congestion, but in long term lead to paradigm shifts in overall urban and economic policy.en
dc.formatPDFen
dc.format.extent39 leavesen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherGeorgetown Universityen
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciencesen
dc.sourcePublic Policy & Policy Managementen
dc.subject.lcshCity planningen
dc.subject.lcshTransportation; Planningen
dc.subject.otherUrban planningen
dc.subject.otherTransportation planningen
dc.titleWhy Americans are Driving Less?en
dc.typethesisen


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