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dc.date.accessioned2014-10-21T18:43:00Zen
dc.date.available2014-10-21T18:43:00Zen
dc.date.created1998en
dc.date.issueden
dc.identifier.issn1351-0347en
dc.identifier.issn1743-890Xen
dc.identifier.urien
dc.description.abstractPrompted by serious economic difficulties, in 1989 the Jordanian government launched a series of political liberalization measures aimed at rejuvenating the country's parliament and party politics, and restoring freedom to the media. Despite much initial enthusiasm, the liberalization process has become frozen and there have been few substantive moves toward a meaningful transition to democracy. Two developments have combined to result in this democratization freeze. One is the reluctance of the state to give up many of its powers in relation to the forces of civil society. A second is the inability of professional associations and the emerging parliamentary opposition bloc to formulate and institute viable links within themselves and with other social actors in an attempt to pressure the monarchy for more political concessions. The hybrid, semi‐democratic, absolutist monarchy that has emerged in the process has enhanced its popular legitimacy by adopting certain democratic trappings, which, in the short run at least, appear detrimental to a more meaningful transition to democratic rule.en
dc.description.uriDOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/13510349808403551en
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.isPartOfDemocratization, 5(1)en
dc.rightsThis item is currently unavailable in DigitalGeorgetown due to copyright restrictions by the publisher.en
dc.subjectPolitical Scienceen
dc.subject.lcshDemocratization--Jordanen
dc.subject.lcshJordan--Politics and governmenten
dc.titleFrozen Political Liberalization in Jordan: The Consequences for Democracyen
dc.typeArticleen


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