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Cover for The Neurocognition of Adult Second Language Learning: An fMRI Study
dc.contributor.advisorUllman, Michael Ten
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-08T20:23:21Zen
dc.date.available2015-01-08T20:23:21Zen
dc.date.created2014en
dc.date.issueden
dc.date.submitted01/01/2014en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_712460.tar;APT-ETAG: 5552fe070bce11d3b1b35eba92723cbcen
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionPh.D.en
dc.description.abstractLearners achieved very high proficiency in vocabulary and reasonably high proficiency in grammar, though morphosyntactic agreement was difficult to master. FMRI activation was found in areas associated with first language (L1) processing (e.g., BA45/47, and parietal cortex for lexical/semantics, and BA44 and 6 for grammar), suggesting that late-L2 learners have access to L1 regions. Additional areas were engaged, suggesting that L1 mechanisms are not sufficient for L2 learning and processing. At early stages of learning, hippocampal activation was found for both vocabulary and grammar. At later stages, basal ganglia activation was observed for grammar, particularly in the caudate nucleus. The findings suggest that early word and grammar learning relies on declarative memory (and more explicit processes), but that grammar later relies on procedural memory (and more implicit processes). These results highlight the utility of a mini-language model, have implications for neurocognitive theories of L2, and demonstrate the importance of integrating neural and behavioral methods in L2 research.en
dc.formatPDFen
dc.format.extent255 leavesen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherGeorgetown Universityen
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciencesen
dc.sourceLinguisticsen
dc.subjectlanguage learningen
dc.subjectlanguage modelsen
dc.subjectmultilingualismen
dc.subjectneurocognition of languageen
dc.subjectsecond languageen
dc.subject.lcshLinguisticsen
dc.subject.lcshNeurosciencesen
dc.subject.lcshPsychologyen
dc.subject.otherLinguisticsen
dc.subject.otherNeurosciencesen
dc.subject.otherPsychologyen
dc.titleThe Neurocognition of Adult Second Language Learning: An fMRI Studyen
dc.typethesisen


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