Show simple item record

Files in this item

Cover for Arab Migrant Communities in the GCC Summary Report
dc.creatoren
dc.creatoren
dc.creatoren
dc.creatoren
dc.creatoren
dc.creatoren
dc.creatoren
dc.creatoren
dc.creatoren
dc.creatoren
dc.creatoren
dc.creatoren
dc.creatoren
dc.creatoren
dc.creatoren
dc.creatoren
dc.creatoren
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-22T13:05:02Zen
dc.date.available2015-04-22T13:05:02Zen
dc.date.created2015-05en
dc.date.issueden
dc.identifier.issn2227-1686en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_713078.tar;APT-ETAG: b2f76bb8e09a6775a4d56fbecf663522en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.description.abstractIncreasingly, over the past few decades, the cross-border mobility of people and international migration has become a central and dynamic hallmark of human existence. While migration is by no means a recent phenomenon, present-day migratory experiences are increasingly informed by national and international policy settings, and by the needs of the global labor market. In contemporary times, the six Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) member states of Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates have emerged as the third largest hub of international labor migration. In recent years, migration to the GCC has attracted increasing journalistic attention, and a growing body of scholarship from academics. What has gone almost completely unnoticed, however, is the regional, intra-Arab aspect of the phenomenon. Migration into the Gulf region from other Arab countries by far outdates more recent, and comparatively more temporary, migratory patterns from South Asia and Western Europe. Not only are Arab migratory patterns into the GCC comparatively and qualitatively different from other similar patterns, the historical setting within which they have unfolded, the processes through which they have taken place, and their economic, sociological, and political consequences have all been different. This book examines the dynamics involved in the emergence of Arab migrant communities in the Gulf region, focusing specifically on how they came about, their overall sociological compositions and economic profiles, and the causes, processes, and consequences of their interactions with, and integration within, the host countries.en
dc.description.tableOfContentsIntroduction: Arab Migrant Communities in the GCC Zahra Babar, Center for International and Regional Studies, Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatar 1. Working for the Neighbors: Arab Migrants in Qatar Zahra Babar, Center for International and Regional Studies, Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatar 2. Arab Migrant Teachers in the United Arab Emirates and Qatar: Challenges and Opportunities Natasha Ridge, Soha Shami, and Susan Kippels, Sheikh Saud bin Saqr Al Qasimi Foundation for Policy Research 3. The Model Immigrant: Second Generation Hadramis in Kuwait and the Legacy of “Good Reputation” Abdullah Alajmi, Arab Open University in Kuwait 4. “The Egyptian Invasion of Kuwait”: Navigating Possibilities among the Impossible Abbie Taylor, Georgetown University; Nada Soudy, Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar; and Susan Martin, Georgetown University 5. The “Other Arab” and Gulf Citizens: Mutual Accommodation of Palestinians in the UAE in Historical Context Manal A. Jamal, James Madison University 6. Returning Yemeni Migrants from KSA – Analysis of the Character of Yemeni Irregular Migrants in KSA and Potential Impacts/Implications of Large Scale Return Michael Newson, Dax Roque, and Harry Cook, International Organization for Migration 7. An Emerging Trend in Arab Migration: Arab Highly-Skilled Females in the GCC Countries Françoise De Bel-Air, Migration Policy Centre, Florence and Gulf Research Centre, Geneva 8. High-Skilled Lebanese Transnational Migrants: A Kuwait Perspective Garret Maher, Gulf University for Science and Technology in Kuwait 9. Sport Labor Migrant Communities from the Maghreb in the GCC Mahfoud Amara, Loughborough University 10. Attitudes of Students in the GCC towards the Arab Spring: A Case Study of Students in the UAE Georges Naufal, American University of Sharjah; Ismail Genc, American University of Sharjah; and Carlos Vargas-Silva, University of Oxforden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCenter for International and Regional Studiesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCIRS Summary Reports;12en
dc.subjectMigrationen
dc.subjectArab Migrants in the Gulfen
dc.subjectQataren
dc.subjectGulf Cooperation Councilen
dc.subjectTransnational Migrantsen
dc.subjectLebanonen
dc.subjectPalestineen
dc.subjectEgypten
dc.subjectUnited Arab Emiratesen
dc.subjectYemenen
dc.titleArab Migrant Communities in the GCC Summary Reporten


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record