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dc.date.accessioned2015-04-29T20:19:19Zen
dc.date.available2015-04-29T20:19:19Zen
dc.date.created2000en
dc.date.issueden
dc.identifier.issn1754-5382en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.description.abstractThe theme of 'Gulf security' is often addressed from the angle of regional and international threats. It should be clear that the domestic aspect is at least as important, and, indeed, intertwines with the external aspects: threats and responses on both levels are often inextricably linked. The domestic scene, then, will be the focus of this paper. The argument presented here in outline will consider why increased popular grievances and pressures for change are likely, and address the question whether such voices and forces of dissent can, or should, be incorporated into the polity's accepted dynamics - i.e. whether inclusion may be a more fruitful way forward than suppression.en
dc.description.uriDOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/02681300009414860en
dc.publisherRoyal United Services Institute for Defense Studiesen
dc.relation.isPartOfWhitehall Papers, 51(1).en
dc.rightsThis item is currently unavailable in DigitalGeorgetown due to copyright restrictions by the publisher.en
dc.subjectGulf Cooperation Council (GCC)en
dc.subjectSecurityen
dc.subjectQataren
dc.subjectBahrainen
dc.subjectUAEen
dc.titleSecurity and inclusion: regime responses to domestic challenges in the Gulfen
dc.typeArticleen


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