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dc.creatorGoldenring, John M.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:16:57Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:16:57Zen
dc.date.created1985-12en
dc.date.issued1985-12en
dc.identifier10.1136/jme.11.4.198en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Medical Ethics. 1985 Dec; 11(4): 198-204.en
dc.identifier.issn0306-6800en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=The+Brain-Life+Theory:+towards+a+Consistent+Biological+Definition+Of+humanness&title=Journal+of+Medical+Ethics.+&volume=11&issue=4&pages=198-204&date=1985&au=Goldenring,+John+M.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jme.11.4.198en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/726053en
dc.description.abstractThe unsettled question of when human life begins is a key issue in the abortion debate, and often figures in discussions of birth control, treatment of rape victims, fetal research, in vitro fertilization, and disposal of fetal remains. Goldenring proposes a brain-life theory, which maintains that a fetus becomes a biological human being when its brain begins to function at about eight weeks, and argues that this definition of humanness can be determined medically and scientifically, and has relevance for ethical, legal, and public policy decision making. He examines the problems created by other theories of humanness, such as "at conception" and "at viability," and discusses the implications of the brain-life theory for abortion and other bioethical issues such as fetal research. (KIE abstract)en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/20769en
dc.subjectAborted Fetusesen
dc.subjectAbortionen
dc.subjectBeginning of Lifeen
dc.subjectBioethical Issuesen
dc.subjectBrainen
dc.subjectBirth Controlen
dc.subjectContraceptionen
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.subjectFetal Developmenten
dc.subjectFetal Researchen
dc.subjectFetusesen
dc.subjectHuman Experimentationen
dc.subjectHumannessen
dc.subjectIn Vitro Fertilizationen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectPersonhooden
dc.subjectPublic Policyen
dc.subjectRapeen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectViabilityen
dc.titleThe Brain-Life Theory: Towards a Consistent Biological Definition of Humannessen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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