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dc.creatorAvins, Andrew L.en
dc.creatorLo, Bernarden
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:27:35Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:27:35Zen
dc.date.created1989-11en
dc.date.issued1989-11en
dc.identifier10.1016/0168-8510(90)90306-Xen
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationAmerican Journal of Public Health. 1989 Nov; 79(11): 1544-1548.en
dc.identifier.issn0090-0036en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=To+Tell+or+Not+to+Tell:+the+Ethical+Dilemmas+of+HIV+Test+Notification+in+Epidemiologic+Research&title=American+Journal+of+Public+Health.+&volume=79&issue=11&pages=1544-1548&date=1989&au=Avins,+Andrew+L.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0168-8510(90)90306-Xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/734093en
dc.description.abstractEpidemiologic studies involving HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) antibody testing create ethical dilemmas, particularly about notifying asymptomatic seropositive subjects. Four study designs address this problem: mandatory notification, optional notification, anonymous testing, and blind testing. No single design consistently optimizes the trade-off between valid and ethical research. Each strategy differs substantially from the others in its effect on response rates, bias, ability to perform longitudinal studies, numbers of subjects who learn their test results, and the number of subjects counseled about HIV risk reduction. Both local institutional review boards and potential subjects of study (and their sexual partners) should participate in decisions regarding the conduct of sensitive AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) research.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/29502en
dc.subjectAidsen
dc.subjectAids Serodiagnosisen
dc.subjectAnonymous Testingen
dc.subjectAcquired Immunodeficiency Syndromeen
dc.subjectClinical Ethicsen
dc.subjectClinical Ethics Committeesen
dc.subjectConfidentialityen
dc.subjectContact Tracingen
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.subjectDisclosureen
dc.subjectDuty to Warnen
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectEthics Committeesen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHIV Seropositivityen
dc.subjectHuman Experimentationen
dc.subjectInstitutional Review Boardsen
dc.subjectMass Screeningen
dc.subjectMoral Policyen
dc.subjectNotificationen
dc.subjectPublic Healthen
dc.subjectPublic Policyen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectResearch Designen
dc.subjectResearch Ethicsen
dc.subjectResearch Ethics Committeesen
dc.subjectResearch Subjectsen
dc.subjectReviewen
dc.subjectRisken
dc.subjectRisks and Benefitsen
dc.subjectStandardsen
dc.subjectTruth Disclosureen
dc.subjectVoluntary Programsen
dc.titleTo Tell or Not to Tell: The Ethical Dilemmas of HIV Test Notification in Epidemiologic Researchen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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