Show simple item record

dc.creatorProttas, Jeffrey M.en
dc.creatorBatten, Helen Levineen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:27:55Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:27:55Zen
dc.date.created1991en
dc.date.issued1991en
dc.identifier10.1215/03616878-16-1-121en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Health Politics, Policy and Law. 1991 Spring; 16(1): 121-134.en
dc.identifier.issn0361-6878en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=The+Willingness+to+Give:+the+Public+and+the+Supply+of+Transplantable+organs&title=Journal+of+Health+Politics,+Policy+and+Law.++&volume=16&issue=1&pages=121-134&date=1991&au=Prottas,+Jeffrey+M.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1215/03616878-16-1-121en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/734562en
dc.description.abstractWe report the results of a representative random-sample telephone survey of the public's willingness to donate organs. Our goal was to identify differences within the public and target groups who might be receptive to educational efforts to increase donation. We distinguish differences in attitude and demographic characteristics in three groups: those committed to donation, those opposed, and those who might change their opinions with more specific information. While approval of donation is nearly universal, only about half of the public would donate a relative's organs when they do not know the relative's preference. Whites, higher-income individuals, and those with higher educational levels were more favorable. Those who might change their minds fall midway between those committed and those opposed, both demographically and by attitude. They include more nonwhites and more individuals with incomes less than $25,000 than members of the group committed to donation. Targeting public education messages to this group is likely to have the most success in reducing the gap between supply and demand for human organs.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/33639en
dc.subjectAltruismen
dc.subjectAttitudesen
dc.subjectBrainen
dc.subjectBrain Deathen
dc.subjectConsenten
dc.subjectDeathen
dc.subjectDonorsen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectFamily Membersen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Educationen
dc.subjectMass Mediaen
dc.subjectMotivationen
dc.subjectOrgan Donationen
dc.subjectOrgan Donorsen
dc.subjectPublic Opinionen
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Factorsen
dc.subjectSurveyen
dc.subjectThird Party Consenten
dc.subjectTissue Donationen
dc.titleThe Willingness to Give: The Public and the Supply of Transplantable Organsen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


Georgetown University Seal
©2009—2022 Bioethics Research Library
Box 571212 Washington DC 20057-1212
202.687.3885