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dc.creatorSugarman, Jeremyen
dc.creatorWeinberger, Morrisen
dc.creatorSamsa, Gregen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:29:38Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:29:38Zen
dc.date.created1992-02en
dc.date.issued1992-02en
dc.identifier10.1001/archinte.152.2.343en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationArchives of Internal Medicine. 1992 Feb; 152(2): 343-347.en
dc.identifier.issn0003-9926en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Factors+Associated+with+Veterans'+Decisions+about+Living+Wills&title=Archives+of+Internal+Medicine.++&volume=152&issue=2&pages=343-347&date=1992&au=Sugarman,+Jeremyen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archinte.152.2.343en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/735620en
dc.description.abstractMost states have adopted legislation that allows patients to designate by advance directives the type of health care they would like to receive if they should become incompetent while suffering from a terminal illness. The living will is one of the most common of these legal instruments. Unlike most studies that have examined very sick or hospitalized patients' preferences regarding life-sustaining treatments, our study explores the concerns of 70 ambulatory veterans from a general medical clinic regarding living wills. Before the interview, 43% of patients reported never having heard of living wills. At interview, 4% of the patients had a living will, 33% intended to sign a living will but had not done so (INTEND), 54% were undecided about living wills (UNDECIDED), and 9% did not want a living will. Compared with UNDECIDED patients, all other patients did not differ in the use of health care services during the previous year or in diagnoses. INTEND patients, however, were significantly more likely to be white, to express poorer health status, to know someone with a living will, and to have previously discussed the topic. UNDECIDED patients were more likely than INTEND patients to report that religious beliefs about living wills affected their decision. Virtually all (91%) of the respondents believed that signing a living will would not affect their treatment. These data suggest that many patients may not know that they can have a living will and that discussions with those who already have a living will may be helpful in educational programs designed to promote informed patient decision-making.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/35195en
dc.subjectAdvance Directivesen
dc.subjectAge Factorsen
dc.subjectAllowing to Dieen
dc.subjectAmbulatory Careen
dc.subjectAttitudesen
dc.subjectComprehensionen
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.subjectEvaluationen
dc.subjectEvaluation Studiesen
dc.subjectFamily Membersen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectHealth Statusen
dc.subjectIllnessen
dc.subjectLegal Aspectsen
dc.subjectLegislationen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectLiving Willsen
dc.subjectMilitary Personnelen
dc.subjectPatient Careen
dc.subjectPatient Participationen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPhysician Patient Relationshipen
dc.subjectResuscitationen
dc.subjectResuscitation Ordersen
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Factorsen
dc.subjectStatisticsen
dc.subjectSufferingen
dc.subjectSurveyen
dc.subjectWillsen
dc.titleFactors Associated With Veterans' Decisions About Living Willsen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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