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dc.creatorSingelenberg, Richarden
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:30:17Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:30:17Zen
dc.date.created1990en
dc.date.issued1990en
dc.identifier10.1016/0277-9536(90)90048-Wen
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationSocial Science and Medicine. 1990; 31(4): 515-523.en
dc.identifier.issn0277-9536en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=The+Blood+Transfusion+Taboo+of+Jehovah's+Witnesses:+Origin,+development,+and+Function+of+a+Controversial+Doctrine&title=Social+Science+and+Medicine.+&volume=31&issue=4&pages=515-523&date=1990&au=Singelenberg,+Richarden
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0277-9536(90)90048-Wen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/735906en
dc.description.abstractJehovah's Witnesses are not allowed to accept a blood transfusion. According to the Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society this therapy is a transgression of divine precepts. In the judgement of the believers, secular proof is abundant these days; to them AIDS is a powerful justification to abstain from blood. Founded on the work of the anthropologist Mary Douglas, it is argued that the rejection of this medical therapy is based on perceptions of pollution and purity inherent in the Watch Tower Society's ideological concept of anti-worldliness. Rooted in the movement's pre-war opposition to vaccination the implementation of the taboo was triggered by the prevailing social-political climate surrounding the Society during the Second World War, resulting in this intriguing and controversial religious proscription. For the community of Jehovah's Witnesses the blood transfusion taboo still functions as a significant mechanism of sectarian boundary maintenance.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/31989en
dc.subjectAdultsen
dc.subjectAidsen
dc.subjectAttitudesen
dc.subjectBlooden
dc.subjectBlood Transfusionsen
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectFreedomen
dc.subjectGovernmenten
dc.subjectGovernment Regulationen
dc.subjectHistorical Aspectsen
dc.subjectImmunizationen
dc.subjectJehovah's Witnessesen
dc.subjectMandatory Programsen
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectPollutionen
dc.subjectRegulationen
dc.subjectReligionen
dc.subjectRisks and Benefitsen
dc.subjectTheologyen
dc.subjectTreatment Refusalen
dc.subjectVaccinationen
dc.subjectWaren
dc.titleThe Blood Transfusion Taboo of Jehovah's Witnesses: Origin, Development, and Function of a Controversial Doctrineen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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