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dc.creatorBattin, Margareten
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:30:21Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:30:21Zen
dc.date.created1992en
dc.date.issued1992en
dc.identifier10.1111/jlme.1992.20.issue-1-2en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationLaw, Medicine and Health Care. 1992 Spring-Summer; 20(1-2): 133-143.en
dc.identifier.issn0277-8459en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Voluntary+Euthanasia+and+the+Risk+of+Abuse:+Can+We+Learn+Anything+from+the+Netherlands?&title=Law,+Medicine+and+Health+Care.++&volume=20&issue=1-2&pages=133-143&date=1992&au=Battin,+Margareten
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jlme.1992.20.issue-1-2en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/736016en
dc.description.abstract...In general, I think it is crucial to be as clear and forthright about the issue of abuse as possible, even if one supports, as I do, the legalization of aid-in-dying. In doing so, one must answer two central questions: 1) Will there be abuse, and if so, precisely what kind? 2) Can abuse of this sort be prevented? It is to the second of these questions that I will be particularly attentive here. In doing so, I shall consider only the possible effects of legalizing voluntary, active, physician-performed euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, restricted to cases in which such help is requested by competent, terminally ill patients with less than 6 months to live -- that is, I shall be considering only what Initiative 119 would have legalized -- but some of the arguments will clearly apply to a wider range of possible legislation as well....en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/36256en
dc.subjectActive Euthanasiaen
dc.subjectAdvertisingen
dc.subjectAssisted Suicideen
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectCoercionen
dc.subjectCounselingen
dc.subjectConsenten
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.subjectDepressive Disorderen
dc.subjectDiscriminationen
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectEuthanasiaen
dc.subjectGuideline Adherenceen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Facilitiesen
dc.subjectInformed Consenten
dc.subjectInternational Aspectsen
dc.subjectInvoluntary Euthanasiaen
dc.subjectLegal Aspectsen
dc.subjectLegislationen
dc.subjectMoral Policyen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPhysician Patient Relationshipen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectPolicy Analysisen
dc.subjectPublic Policyen
dc.subjectRecordsen
dc.subjectRegulationen
dc.subjectRemunerationen
dc.subjectRightsen
dc.subjectRisken
dc.subjectSocial Discriminationen
dc.subjectStandardsen
dc.subjectSuicideen
dc.subjectSurveyen
dc.subjectTerminally Illen
dc.subjectVoluntary Euthanasiaen
dc.subjectWedge Argumenten
dc.titleVoluntary Euthanasia and the Risk of Abuse: Can We Learn Anything From the Netherlands?en
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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