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dc.creatorHoffmaster, C. Barryen
dc.creatorStewart, Moira A.en
dc.creatorChristie, Ronald J.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:30:43Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:30:43Zen
dc.date.created1991en
dc.date.issued1991en
dc.identifier10.1016/0277-9536(91)90018-8en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationSocial Science and Medicine. 1991; 33(6): 647-653.en
dc.identifier.issn0277-9536en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Ethical+Decision+Making+by+Family+Doctors+in+Canada,+Britain+and+The+united+States&title=Social+Science+and+Medicine.++&volume=33&issue=6&pages=647-653&date=1991&au=Hoffmaster,+C.+Barryen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0277-9536(91)90018-8en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/736624en
dc.description.abstractFamily doctors in Canada and the U.S. and general practitioners in England and Wales were sent a questionnaire containing six cases that raised moral issues. The doctors were asked to select the most appropriate course of action for each case as well as reasons for that decision. The ethical problems concerned how much information to divulge to patients, how extensively a physician should become involved in the lifestyles of patients, and how to deal with a possible family problem. The respondents selected different courses of action for the cases. More U.S. than Canadian or British physicians chose to divulge information, while more British than Canadian or U.S. physicians chose not to become involved in patients' lifestyles. Physicians who chose to divulge information were likely to be young, male, live in a small community, and have no academic affiliation. Physicians who chose not to become involved in lifestyle issues were likely to be young, church attenders, and in group practice in a small community.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/35175en
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectBeneficenceen
dc.subjectBioethicsen
dc.subjectCase Studiesen
dc.subjectCasuistryen
dc.subjectClinical Ethicsen
dc.subjectConfidentialityen
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.subjectDiagnosisen
dc.subjectDisclosureen
dc.subjectDoctorsen
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectEthical Analysisen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectEvaluationen
dc.subjectEvaluation Studiesen
dc.subjectFamily Membersen
dc.subjectFamily Practiceen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectInternational Aspectsen
dc.subjectIllnessen
dc.subjectLifestyleen
dc.subjectMedical Ethicsen
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subjectMoral Policyen
dc.subjectPatient Careen
dc.subjectPatient Participationen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPhysician Patient Relationshipen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectPrimary Health Careen
dc.subjectSelf Induced Illnessen
dc.subjectSmokingen
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Factorsen
dc.subjectSociologyen
dc.subjectSociology of Medicineen
dc.subjectSurveyen
dc.subjectTruth Disclosureen
dc.subjectValuesen
dc.titleEthical Decision Making by Family Doctors in Canada, Britain and the United Statesen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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