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dc.creatorLa Puma, Johnen
dc.creatorStocking, Carol B.en
dc.creatorLa Voie, Danen
dc.creatorDarling, Cheryl A.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:30:46Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:30:46Zen
dc.date.created1991-10en
dc.date.issued1991-10en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationNew England Journal of Medicine. 1991 Oct 31; 325(18): 1290-1294.en
dc.identifier.issn0028-4793en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=When+Physicians+Treat+Members+of+Their+Own+Families:+Practices+in+A+community+Hospital&title=New+England+Journal+of+Medicine.++&volume=325&issue=18&pages=1290-1294&date=1991&au=La+Puma,+Johnen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/736713en
dc.description.abstractBackground: Little is known about the circumstances under which physicians care for family members. We sought to examine current practice and, in particular, to learn how often family members request medical care or treatment, whether physicians accede to such requests, and what concerns, if any, physicians have about caring for their family members. Methods: In late 1990 we distributed a pretested, structured questionnaire to all members of the active medical staff (physicians with M.D. or D.O. degrees) of a large suburban community teaching hospital. Of 691 eligible members of the medical staff, 465 physicians responded. Results: Of the 465 respondents, 461 (99 percent) reported requests from family members for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. A total of 386 (83 percent of the respondents) had prescribed medication for a family member, 372 (80 percent) had diagnosed medical illnesses, 334 (72 percent) had performed physical examinations, 68 (15 percent) had acted as a family member's primary attending physician in the hospital, and 44 (9 percent) had operated on a family member. In addition, 152 (33 percent) reported that they had observed another physician "inappropriately involved" in a family member's care, and 103 (22 percent) had acceded to a specific request about which they felt uncomfortable. Conclusions: Practicing physicians often attend and treat their family members and diagnose their illnesses. They may often experience some disquiet in doing so. For physicians, complete medical data, proper training, and sound judgment are essential when family members request treatment.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/34629en
dc.subjectAttitudesen
dc.subjectCaringen
dc.subjectDiagnosisen
dc.subjectDrugsen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectFamily Membersen
dc.subjectFamily Relationshipen
dc.subjectHospitalsen
dc.subjectMedical Ethicsen
dc.subjectMethodsen
dc.subjectPatient Careen
dc.subjectPhysician Patient Relationshipen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectProfessional Patient Relationshipen
dc.subjectPsychological Stressen
dc.subjectRefusal to Treaten
dc.subjectRisks and Benefitsen
dc.subjectStatisticsen
dc.subjectSurgeryen
dc.subjectSurveyen
dc.titleWhen Physicians Treat Members of Their Own Families: Practices in a Community Hospitalen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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