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dc.creatorAnnas, George J.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:34:09Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:34:09Zen
dc.date.created1992-03-12en
dc.date.issued1992-03-12en
dc.identifier10.1056/NEJM199203123261117en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationNew England Journal of Medicine. 1992 Mar 12; 326(11): 770-773.en
dc.identifier.issn0028-4793en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Changing+the+Consent+Rules+for+Desert+Storm&title=New+England+Journal+of+Medicine.++&volume=326&issue=11&pages=770-773&date=1992&au=Annas,+George+J.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJM199203123261117en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/737106en
dc.description.abstractShortly before the beginning of Operation Desert Storm, during Desert Shield, the U.S. military sought a waiver of requirements for informed consent for the use of investigational drugs and vaccines on our troops in the Persian Gulf. The danger of chemical and biologic warfare was seen as demanding this waiver, although the Nuremberg Code, other codes of medical ethics, and respect for the human rights of American soldiers seemed to caution against it. One year later it seems reasonable to review this decision. The legal maneuvering to revise consent regulations for wartime conditions provides a case study that highlights three separable issues: how easily the line between therapy and experimentation can become blurred; the differences between law and ethics; and the ethical obligations of physicians when the interests of their patients conflict with the interests of their employer.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/36152en
dc.subjectBiological Warfareen
dc.subjectConsenten
dc.subjectDrugsen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectFederal Governmenten
dc.subjectFooden
dc.subjectGovernmenten
dc.subjectGovernment Regulationen
dc.subjectHuman Experimentationen
dc.subjectHuman Rightsen
dc.subjectImmunizationen
dc.subjectInformed Consenten
dc.subjectInvestigational Drugsen
dc.subjectJudicial Actionen
dc.subjectLawen
dc.subjectLegal Aspectsen
dc.subjectMedical Ethicsen
dc.subjectMilitary Personnelen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPhysician's Roleen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectPolicy Analysisen
dc.subjectRegulationen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectResearch Subjectsen
dc.subjectReviewen
dc.subjectRightsen
dc.subjectTreatment Refusalen
dc.subjectVaccinesen
dc.subjectWaren
dc.titleChanging the Consent Rules for Desert Stormen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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