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dc.creatorDrickamer, Margaret A.en
dc.creatorLachs, Mark S.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:34:22Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:34:22Zen
dc.date.created1992-04-02en
dc.date.issued1992-04-02en
dc.identifier10.1056/NEJM199204023261410en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationNew England Journal of Medicine. 1992 Apr 2; 326(14): 947-951.en
dc.identifier.issn0028-4793en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Should+Patients+with+Alzheimer's+Disease+Be+Told+Their+diagnosis?&title=New+England+Journal+of+Medicine.++&volume=326&issue=14&pages=947-951&date=1992&au=Drickamer,+Margaret+A.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJM199204023261410en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/737421en
dc.description.abstract...Over the past two decades, a growing body of literature has addressed the issue of revealing the diagnosis to patients with cancer, but there are problems in applying the same rationale to patients with Alzheimer's disease. Many of the arguments that support telling the patient with cancer assume relative accuracy of diagnosis, an array of therapeutic options, a predictable natural history, and a fully competent patient. All these may be absent in the patient with probable Alzheimer's disease. Despite the belief of some experts that the diagnosis should routinely be disclosed to patients with dementing illnesses, this complex issue has not been addressed adequately. The purpose of this paper is to present opposing views on the subject. Although we support the concept of truth-telling, there are important caveats that should be considered. For the purpose of discussion, we focus on patients with Alzheimer's disease, but many of the considerations are equally applicable to patients with other progressive dementing illnesses....en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/36458en
dc.subjectAdvance Directivesen
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectAttitudesen
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectCompetenceen
dc.subjectConsenten
dc.subjectDementiaen
dc.subjectDiagnosisen
dc.subjectDisclosureen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.subjectFamily Membersen
dc.subjectHuman Experimentationen
dc.subjectLegal Aspectsen
dc.subjectLiteratureen
dc.subjectPaternalismen
dc.subjectPatient Careen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPersonhooden
dc.subjectPrognosisen
dc.subjectPsychological Stressen
dc.subjectRightsen
dc.subjectRisks and Benefitsen
dc.subjectThird Party Consenten
dc.subjectTruth Disclosureen
dc.titleShould Patients With Alzheimer's Disease Be Told Their Diagnosis?en
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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