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dc.creatorTeo, Bernarden
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:44:34Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:44:34Zen
dc.date.created1992-04en
dc.date.issued1992-04en
dc.identifier10.1111/biot.1992.6.issue-2en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationBioethics. 1992 Apr; 6(2): 113-129.en
dc.identifier.issn0269-9702en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Is+the+Adoption+of+More+Efficient+Strategies+of+Organ+Procurement+The+answer+to+Persistent+Organ+Shortage+in+Transplantation?&title=Bioethics.++&volume=6&issue=2&pages=113-129&date=1992&au=Teo,+Bernarden
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/biot.1992.6.issue-2en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/740627en
dc.description.abstract[I]s persistent organ shortage the major obstacle to the performance of more procedures as often popularly portrayed? Does the answer therefore lie in the adoption of more efficient strategies of organ procurement? While the measures taken to improve the efficiency of organ procurement may be inspired by the laudable motive of saving lives, they may ultimately prove to be myopic if the larger ethical issues raised by organ transplant programs for the allocation of national and organ resources are not given their due consideration. For any society that desires to include organ transplantation in its health delivery system, it must consider the social and ethical issues that transplant programs raise for the macroallocation of available national resources and the manner by which organ resources are procured, and distributed. The failure to resolve these issues in an ethically acceptable manner at any of these levels would render any transplant program ethically indefensible. This essay therefore argues that before a society decides on its policy of organ procurement it ought to make prior assessments of: a) its social priorities; b) the policies for ensuring fair access to organ resources; and c) the extent to which it is willing to support transplants.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/39286en
dc.subjectAdoptionen
dc.subjectBiomedical Technologiesen
dc.subjectBody Parts and Fluidsen
dc.subjectCadaversen
dc.subjectCosts and Benefitsen
dc.subjectConsenten
dc.subjectDonorsen
dc.subjectFamily Membersen
dc.subjectFinancial Supporten
dc.subjectGovernmenten
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectHealth Insuranceen
dc.subjectIndigentsen
dc.subjectInsuranceen
dc.subjectJusticeen
dc.subjectMoral Policyen
dc.subjectOrgan Donationen
dc.subjectOrgan Donorsen
dc.subjectOrgan Transplantationen
dc.subjectOrgan Procurementen
dc.subjectPresumed Consenten
dc.subjectPublic Participationen
dc.subjectPublic Policyen
dc.subjectRemunerationen
dc.subjectRequired Requesten
dc.subjectResource Allocationen
dc.subjectScarcityen
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Factorsen
dc.subjectState Governmenten
dc.subjectTissue Donationen
dc.subjectTissue Transplantationen
dc.subjectTransplantationen
dc.titleIs the Adoption of More Efficient Strategies of Organ Procurement the Answer to Persistent Organ Shortage in Transplantation?en
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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