Show simple item record

dc.creatorMcCullough, Laurence B.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:44:34Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:44:34Zen
dc.date.created1993-02en
dc.date.issued1993-02en
dc.identifier10.1093/jmp/18.1.1en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Medicine and Philosophy. 1993 Feb; 18(1): 1-8.en
dc.identifier.issn0360-5310en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Laying+Clinical+Ethics+Open&title=Journal+of+Medicine+and+Philosophy.++&volume=18&issue=1&pages=1-8&date=1993&au=McCullough,+Laurence+B.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jmp/18.1.1en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/740630en
dc.description.abstract[T]he very strength of bioethics over the past several decades emanates from two complementary intellectual commitments. First, the humanities, philosophy especially, should end their inward turn away from the world that occurred during the middle third of our century. Instead, philosophy and the humanities should critically engage human experience, practices, and institutions. In doing so, philosophy returns to the self-understanding that has dominated the previous history of Western philosophy, American philosophy especially. Given the importance and power of medicine, the engagement of medicine by philosophy and the humanities was lent vitality and urgency. Philosophy and the humanities began to make a difference in the clinical setting. Second, medicine should beware understanding itself solely in terms of a narrow medical model of applied biology. Instead, medicine (and the other health care professions) should reflect carefully on such central matters as the nature of the professional-patient relationship, the irreducible influence of economics (once of abundance, now of scarcity) on clinical judgment, the nature and limits of the physician's power, and the fiduciary role of health care institutions. Putting these assumptions into practice has engendered a dialogue between medicine and philosophy and the other humanities that is one of signal intellectual achievements of the last third of our century -- and for the foreseeable future. To sunder medicine and philosophy -- as Siegler, Pellegrino, and Singer, on the one hand, and Wikler, on the other, would have us do -- would end prematurely and unnecessarily one of the great intellectual adventures in the histories of both medicine and philosophy. In short, the enterprise of laying medicine open to philosophy and of laying philosophy open to medicine has only just begun. Laying clinical ethics open is one of the newest and exciting frontiers of this enterprise. In this spirit, therefore theen
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/39276en
dc.subjectBioethicsen
dc.subjectBiologyen
dc.subjectClinical Ethicsen
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.subjectConsultationen
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectEthicistsen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectEthics Committeesen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectHumanitiesen
dc.subjectInterdisciplinary Communicationen
dc.subjectMedical Educationen
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subjectNatureen
dc.subjectPatient Careen
dc.subjectPhilosophyen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectPoweren
dc.subjectReferral and Consultationen
dc.subjectScarcityen
dc.subjectTechnical Expertiseen
dc.titleLaying Clinical Ethics Openen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


Georgetown University Seal
©2009—2018 Bioethics Research Library
Box 571212 Washington DC 20057-1212
202.687.3885