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dc.creatorWeil, Jonen
dc.creatorMacKay, Charles R.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:45:40Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:45:40Zen
dc.date.created1993en
dc.date.issued1993en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationCambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics. 1993 Spring; 2(2): 229-237.en
dc.identifier.issn0963-1801en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Howard:+Paternity+and+Pandora's+Box.&title=Cambridge+Quarterly+of+Healthcare+Ethics.++&volume=2&issue=2&pages=229-237&date=1993&au=Weil,+Jonen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/740927en
dc.description.abstractHoward, a young man named in a paternity suit, came to the Chief of the Genetics Clinic at a large teaching hospital to declare the charges against him false and ask for help in mounting evidence for his defense. Howard submitted to HLA testing, as did the mother and child; but in Howard's zeal to prove his innocence, he insisted that his siblings and parents also be tested to show conclusively there was no paternal link between himself and the child in question. The results of the tests solved one problem while creating another. Although the tests showed that Howard was not the father of the child as charged, the tests also indicated that the man Howard believed to be his own father could not, in fact, be his biological parent. The geneticist brought the case to the new ethics committee at a large teaching hospital to ask, "What, if anything, should be done with this information? Does a physician have the right to withhold information that, although acquired accidentally, would have great import for the patient?" In presenting his dilemma regarding Howard's situation, the geneticist also described a related and common problem of who owns the information. For example, a person comes in for genetic counseling about a particular family disorder. In the course of establishing a pedigree, it comes to light that there are relatives who are at high risk of developing a life-threatening disease that is preventable. What is the doctor's obligation to such a person who is not a patient and about whom crucial information has been learned through privileged communication?en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherPacific Medical Center (San Francisco). Bioethics Committeeen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/39949en
dc.subjectCase Studiesen
dc.subjectClinical Ethicsen
dc.subjectClinical Ethics Committeesen
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.subjectConfidentialityen
dc.subjectCounselingen
dc.subjectDisclosureen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectEthics Committeesen
dc.subjectFamily Membersen
dc.subjectFamily Relationshipen
dc.subjectFathersen
dc.subjectGenetic Counselingen
dc.subjectGeneticsen
dc.subjectGenetic Screeningen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Personnelen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectParent Child Relationshipen
dc.subjectParentsen
dc.subjectPaternityen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPedigreeen
dc.subjectPrivacyen
dc.subjectPrivileged Communicationen
dc.subjectPsychological Stressen
dc.subjectRisken
dc.subjectRisks and Benefitsen
dc.subjectRelativesen
dc.subjectSiblingsen
dc.titleHoward: Paternity and Pandora's Boxen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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