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dc.creatorFee, Elizabethen
dc.creatorKrieger, Nancyen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:47:25Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:47:25Zen
dc.date.created1993-10en
dc.date.issued1993-10en
dc.identifier10.2105/AJPH.83.10.1477en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationAmerican Journal of Public Health. 1993 Oct; 83(10): 1477-1486.en
dc.identifier.issn0090-0036en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Understanding+Aids:+Historical+Interpretations+and+the+Limits+Of+biomedical+Individualism&title=American+Journal+of+Public+Health.++&volume=83&issue=10&pages=1477-1486&date=1993&au=Fee,+Elizabethen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.83.10.1477en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/741815en
dc.description.abstractThe popular and scientific understanding of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the United States has been shaped by successive historical constructions or paradigms of disease. In the first paradigm, AIDS was conceived of as a "gay plague," by analogy with the sudden, devasting epidemics of the past. In the second, AIDS was normalized as a chronic disease to be managed medically over the long term. By examining and extending critiques of both paradigms, it is possible to discern the emergence of an alternative paradigm of AIDS as a collective chronic infectious disease and persistent pandemic. Each of these constructions of AIDS incorporates distinct views of the etiology, prevention, pathology, and treatment of disease; each tacitly promotes different conceptions of the proper allocation of individual and social responsibility for AIDS. This paper focuses on individualistic vs collective, and biomedical vs social and historical, understandings of disease. It analyzes the uses of individualism as methodology and as ideology, criticizes some basic assumptions of the biomedical model, and discusses alternative strategies for scientific research, health policy, and disease prevention.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/41628en
dc.subjectAidsen
dc.subjectAids Serodiagnosisen
dc.subjectAlternative Therapiesen
dc.subjectAnalogyen
dc.subjectAttitudesen
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectAcquired Immunodeficiency Syndromeen
dc.subjectBiomedical Researchen
dc.subjectBlooden
dc.subjectBlood Donationen
dc.subjectChronically Illen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.subjectDrug Abuseen
dc.subjectDiscriminationen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectHealth Care Deliveryen
dc.subjectHealth Personnelen
dc.subjectHistorical Aspectsen
dc.subjectHIV Seropositivityen
dc.subjectHomosexualsen
dc.subjectIllnessen
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subjectMetaphoren
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectPolitical Activityen
dc.subjectPreventive Medicineen
dc.subjectPublic Healthen
dc.subjectPublic Policyen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectSelf Induced Illnessen
dc.subjectSocial Discriminationen
dc.subjectSocial Problemsen
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Factorsen
dc.subjectSociologyen
dc.subjectSociology of Medicineen
dc.subjectStigmatizationen
dc.titleUnderstanding Aids: Historical Interpretations and the Limits of Biomedical Individualismen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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