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dc.creatorRyder, R.E.J.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:48:46Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:48:46Zen
dc.date.created1993-09-18en
dc.date.issued1993-09-18en
dc.identifier10.1136/bmj.307.6906.723en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationBMJ (British Medical Journal). 1993 Sep 18; 307(6906): 723-726.en
dc.identifier.issn0959-8138en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle="natural+Family+Planning":+Effective+Birth+Control+Supported+by+The+catholic+Church&title=BMJ+&volume=307&issue=6906&pages=723-726&date=1993&au=Ryder,+R.E.J.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.307.6906.723en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/743193en
dc.description.abstractDuring 20-22 September Manchester is to host the 1993 follow up to last year's "earth summit" in Rio de Janeiro. At that summit the threat posed by world overpopulation received considerable attention. Catholicism was perceived as opposed to birth control and therefore as a particular threat. This was based on the notion that the only method of birth control approved by the church -- natural family planning -- is unreliable, unacceptable, and ineffective. In the 20 years since E L Billings and colleagues first described the cervical mucus symptoms associated with ovulation natural family planning has incorporated these symptoms and advanced considerably. Ultrasonography shows that the symptoms identify ovulation precisely. According to the World Health Organisation, 93% of women everywhere can identify the symptoms, which distinguish adequately between the fertile and infertile phases of the menstrual cycle. Most pregnancies during trials of natural family planning occur after intercourse at times recognised by couples as fertile. Thus pregnancy rates have depended on the motivation of couples. Increasingly studies show that rates equivalent to those with other contraceptive methods are readily achieved in the developed and developing worlds. Indeed, a study of 19843 poor women in India had a pregnancy rate approaching zero. Natural family planning is cheap, effective, without side effects, and may be particularly acceptable to and efficacious among people in areas of poverty.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/41382en
dc.subjectBirth Controlen
dc.subjectContraceptionen
dc.subjectDeveloping Countriesen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectEvaluationen
dc.subjectFamily Planningen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectMethodsen
dc.subjectMotivationen
dc.subjectPopulation Controlen
dc.subjectPovertyen
dc.subjectPregnancyen
dc.subjectRoman Catholic Ethicsen
dc.subjectUltrasonographyen
dc.subjectWorld Healthen
dc.title"Natural Family Planning": Effective Birth Control Supported by the Catholic Churchen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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