Show simple item record

dc.creatorIris, Madelyn Anneen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:50:02Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:50:02Zen
dc.date.created1995en
dc.date.issued1995en
dc.identifier10.1017/S0963180100005806en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationCambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics. 1995 Spring; 4(2): 135-141.en
dc.identifier.issn0963-1801en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=The+Ethics+of+Decision+Making+for+the+Critically+Ill+Elderly&title=Cambridge+Quarterly+of+Healthcare+Ethics.++&volume=4&issue=2&pages=135-141&date=1995&au=Iris,+Madelyn+Anneen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0963180100005806en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/744258en
dc.description.abstractIn this paper I explore a set of factors that impact on the decision-making process. Because these factors emanate from a variety of disciplines and professions, it is difficult to create a unified model of the decision-making process encapsulated within a single framework. I believe, however, that anthropology provides us with a perspective or approach useful in explicating the varying points of view present, and the ways in which they interact or intersect. My focus is on medical decision making in particular, as old age in America today, as well as death and dying for all age groups, is a highly medicalized experience. Within the specter of medical decision making I include decisions made in both acute and long-term care facilities. Less is known about the types and patterns of decisions made in private settings, such as the home, when only family members or friends may be present. However, personal experience and anecodotal reports suggest that such decisions are qualitatively different in nature and warrant their own investigation.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/47323en
dc.subjectAdvance Directivesen
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectAllowing to Dieen
dc.subjectAnthropologyen
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectBiomedical Technologiesen
dc.subjectChronically Illen
dc.subjectCompetenceen
dc.subjectCritically Illen
dc.subjectDeathen
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.subjectDementiaen
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectEmpirical Researchen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectFamily Membersen
dc.subjectFriendsen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectHealth Care Deliveryen
dc.subjectHospitalsen
dc.subjectInstitutional Policiesen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectLong-Term Careen
dc.subjectMethodsen
dc.subjectNatureen
dc.subjectNursing Homesen
dc.subjectPatient Careen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPhysician Patient Relationshipen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectProlongation of Lifeen
dc.subjectPublic Policyen
dc.subjectRegulationen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectRight to Dieen
dc.subjectTerminally Illen
dc.subjectTreatment Refusalen
dc.subjectValuesen
dc.titleThe Ethics of Decision Making for the Critically Ill Elderlyen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


Georgetown University Seal
©2009—2018 Bioethics Research Library
Box 571212 Washington DC 20057-1212
202.687.3885