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dc.creatorMoskowitz, Ellen H.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:56:46Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:56:46Zen
dc.date.created1996-04en
dc.date.issued1996-04en
dc.identifier10.1093/jmp/21.2.149en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Medicine and Philosophy. 1996 Apr; 21(2): 149-168.en
dc.identifier.issn0360-5310en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Moral+Consensus+in+Public+Ethics:+Patient+Autonomy+and+Family+decisionmaking+in+the+Work+of+One+State+Bioethics+Commission&title=Journal+of+Medicine+and+Philosophy.++&volume=21&issue=2&pages=149-168&date=1996&au=Moskowitz,+Ellen+H.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jmp/21.2.149en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/748611en
dc.description.abstractFocusing on the work of one bioethics commission, the New York State Task Force on Life and the Law, this article explores the role played by moral consensus in public ethics. Task Force members, who were appointed to represent diverse interests in New York State, identified a culturally strong value of individual autonomy as the ethical basis for their work on life-sustaining treatment. This moral consensus permitted the members to unite across their differences and develop public policy recommendations that substantially reformed a highly troubling New York law. However, the principle of autonomy insufficiently guides decisions by caring family members for incompetent adults in cases where little is known of patient preference. A different, more innovative moral vision is required -- one that grants a more robust moral authority to the family. While government efforts that rely on moral consensus developed in a broad-based and well-reasoned manner can serve us well, in some cases the consensus will provide inadequate moral guidance. Government bioethical efforts must guard against the limits of moral vision in light of their disproportionate societal power.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/50828en
dc.subjectAdultsen
dc.subjectAdvance Directivesen
dc.subjectAdvisory Committeesen
dc.subjectAllowing to Dieen
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectBeneficenceen
dc.subjectBioethicsen
dc.subjectCaringen
dc.subjectConsensusen
dc.subjectConsenten
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.subjectDemocracyen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectFamily Membersen
dc.subjectFamily Relationshipen
dc.subjectGovernmenten
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Personnelen
dc.subjectLawen
dc.subjectLegal Aspectsen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectMoral Policyen
dc.subjectProlongation of Lifeen
dc.subjectPublic Participationen
dc.subjectPublic Policyen
dc.subjectPoweren
dc.subjectResuscitationen
dc.subjectRight to Dieen
dc.subjectStandardsen
dc.subjectState Governmenten
dc.subjectThird Party Consenten
dc.subjectTreatment Refusalen
dc.subjectValue of Lifeen
dc.subjectValuesen
dc.subjectWithholding Treatmenten
dc.titleMoral Consensus in Public Ethics: Patient Autonomy and Family Decisionmaking in the Work of One State Bioethics Commissionen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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