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dc.creatorFurrow, Barry R.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:56:48Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:56:48Zen
dc.date.created1996en
dc.date.issued1996en
dc.identifier10.1017/S0963180100006940en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationCambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics. 1996 Spring; 5(2): 204-213.en
dc.identifier.issn0963-1801en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Must+Physicians+Reveal+Their+Wounds?&title=Cambridge+Quarterly+of+Healthcare+Ethics.++&volume=5&issue=2&pages=204-213&date=1996&au=Furrow,+Barry+R.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0963180100006940en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/748656en
dc.description.abstract...Informed consent law embodies the social policy that unqualified practitioners present socially impermissible risks. If unqualified, handicapped, alcoholic, or HIV-infected healthcare professionals create an unacceptable level of risk to patients, they should be barred from practice. But disclosure of their "wounds" makes no sense. This is a distortion of the purpose of the informed consent doctrine, destroying provider privacy while improperly relieving state authorities and hospitals of their burden to monitor their physicians and set proper and reasonable standards for practice. Informed consent doctrine is ill suited to carry such additional baggage -- it is unfair to providers, moves doctrine into an area of risk with no clear stopping point or bright line, and is simply not justified by a risk analysis.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/50713en
dc.subjectAlcohol Abuseen
dc.subjectCompetenceen
dc.subjectConsenten
dc.subjectDisclosureen
dc.subjectEmploymenten
dc.subjectHIV Seropositivityen
dc.subjectHospitalsen
dc.subjectInformed Consenten
dc.subjectLawen
dc.subjectLegal Aspectsen
dc.subjectPatient Careen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectPrivacyen
dc.subjectProfessional Competenceen
dc.subjectPsychological Stressen
dc.subjectRegulationen
dc.subjectRisken
dc.subjectSelf Regulationen
dc.subjectSex Offensesen
dc.subjectStandardsen
dc.subjectTechnical Expertiseen
dc.subjectTreatment Outcomeen
dc.titleMust Physicians Reveal Their Wounds?en
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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