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dc.creatorEllin, Josephen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:57:18Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:57:18Zen
dc.date.created1996-01en
dc.date.issued1996-01en
dc.identifier10.1111/biot.1996.10.issue-1en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationBioethics. 1996 Jan; 10(1): 56-70.en
dc.identifier.issn0269-9702en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Assisting+Suicide+in+Michigan&title=Bioethics.++&volume=10&issue=1&pages=56-70&date=1996&au=Ellin,+Josephen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/biot.1996.10.issue-1en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/748894en
dc.description.abstractPerhaps no American state has seen more legal activity on assisting suicide than Michigan, but despite legislation, a study Commission, several legal cases and a state Supreme Court ruling, the state seems much further from a humane resolution of the question than when the activities of Dr. Jack Kevorkian began in June of 1990. This note summarizes major legal events over a twelve-month period (ending May '95), which included jury acquittal of Dr. Kevorkian, the inconclusive report of the Michigan Commission on Death and Dying, the failure of the state legislature to enact legislation to replace the expired absolute but temporary prohibition, and the decision of the Michigan Supreme Court in Mich. v. Kevorkian declaring assisting suicide a common law felony and ruling that in certain circumstances a person assisting suicide can be prosecuted for murder. The Commission's model decriminalization proposal and the bills subsequently introduced in the legislature (all of which to varying degrees surrounded assisting suicide with restrictions and safeguards), as well as the decision of the Supreme Court, are discussed. Certain puzzling features of the latter, especially with regard to the kind of causation that can turn helping another commit suicide into murder are noted.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/49919en
dc.subjectAdvisory Committeesen
dc.subjectAssisted Suicideen
dc.subjectConstitutional Lawen
dc.subjectCounselingen
dc.subjectCriminal Lawen
dc.subjectDeathen
dc.subjectGovernmenten
dc.subjectIntentionen
dc.subjectKillingen
dc.subjectLawen
dc.subjectLegal Aspectsen
dc.subjectLegal Liabilityen
dc.subjectLegislationen
dc.subjectLiabilityen
dc.subjectModel Legislationen
dc.subjectMurderen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectPublic Policyen
dc.subjectState Governmenten
dc.subjectSufferingen
dc.subjectSuicideen
dc.subjectTerminally Illen
dc.titleAssisting Suicide in Michiganen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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