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dc.creatorMusschenga, Albert W.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:57:48Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:57:48Zen
dc.date.created1997-02en
dc.date.issued1997-02en
dc.identifier10.1093/jmp/22.1.11en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Medicine and Philosophy. 1997 Feb; 22(1): 11-28.en
dc.identifier.issn0360-5310en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=The+Relation+between+Concepts+of+Quality-of-Life,+Health+And+happiness&title=Journal+of+Medicine+and+Philosophy.++&volume=22&issue=1&pages=11-28&date=1997&au=Musschenga,+Albert+W.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jmp/22.1.11en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/749762en
dc.description.abstractIn the last two decades, the term "quality-of-life" has become popular in medicine and health care. There are, however, important differences in the meaning and the use of the term. The message of all quality-of-life talk is that medicine and health care are not valuable in themselves. They are valuable to the extent that they contribute to the quality of life of patients. The ultimate aims of medicine and health care are not health or prolongation of life as such, but preservation or improvement of the quality of life. The primary aims of medicine and health care, such as the prolongation of life, can -- but need not always -- come into conflict with the ultimate ones: medical treatments do not always benefit a patient. In this article I will, first, summarize the results of my explorations of the use and the meaning of the term "quality-of-life." The use and the meaning of the term turn out to depend on the contexts of medical decision-making in which it is used. I will show that there are at least three different concepts of quality-of-life. Second, I will argue that the different concepts of quality-of-life are not unrelated. They point to different components of and/or conditions for happiness. Third, I will analyze the relation between the three concepts of quality-of-life, health and happiness.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:MEDKIE/97249573en
dc.subjectAllowing to Dieen
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectChronically Illen
dc.subjectCultural Pluralismen
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.subjectEmotionsen
dc.subjectEvaluationen
dc.subjectGoalsen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectHealth Servicesen
dc.subjectHealth Services Researchen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subjectPatient Careen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPhilosophyen
dc.subjectPrognosisen
dc.subjectProlongation of Lifeen
dc.subjectQuality of Lifeen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectRisks and Benefitsen
dc.subjectSelection for Treatmenten
dc.subjectSocial Sciencesen
dc.subjectStandardsen
dc.subjectTerminologyen
dc.subjectTreatment Outcomeen
dc.subjectValuesen
dc.subjectWithholding Treatmenten
dc.titleThe Relation Between Concepts of Quality-of-Life, Health, and Happinessen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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