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dc.creatorHerskovits, Elizabethen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:58:41Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:58:41Zen
dc.date.created1995-06en
dc.date.issued1995-06en
dc.identifier10.1525/maq.1995.9.issue-2en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationMedical Anthropology Quarterly. 1995 Jun; 9(2): 146-164.en
dc.identifier.issn0745-5194en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Struggling+over+Subjectivity:+Debates+about+the+"self"+And+alzheimer's+Disease&title=Medical+Anthropology+Quarterly.++&volume=9&issue=2&pages=146-164&date=1995&au=Herskovits,+Elizabethen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1525/maq.1995.9.issue-2en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/749801en
dc.description.abstractThe current conception of Alzheimer's disease emerged in the 1970s and achieved wide acceptance and popularization because it effectively served political-economic interests, solved pragmatic, clinical, and psychological problems, and met philosophical and ethical concerns. But the very success of this widespread acceptance and popularization has produced a troubling dilemma regarding the subjectivity of the person diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. A "loss of self" is implicit in the current Alzheimer's construct, and it has been argued that, consequently, the subjective experience of being and becoming old has become increasingly distressing. It has been further suggested that a response to this unintended assault on the self can be seen in the now burgeoning literature offering diverse representations of and debates about the "self" in Alzheimer's. What appears to be at stake in these competing voices is our very notion of what comprises the self and what constitutes subjective experience. Finally, one can speculate why, as a culture, we tell these stories about aging: it could be that, as a society as well as a community of gerontological thinkers and practitioners, our struggle with the nature of the self-in-Alzheimer's reflects our struggle to grapple with what it will be like, and what it will mean, to be and become old.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:MEDKIE/95401047en
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectAgingen
dc.subjectAttitudesen
dc.subjectBiomedical Researchen
dc.subjectCultureen
dc.subjectDehumanizationen
dc.subjectDementiaen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectHealth Personnelen
dc.subjectIndustryen
dc.subjectInvestigatorsen
dc.subjectLiteratureen
dc.subjectMental Healthen
dc.subjectMetaphoren
dc.subjectNatureen
dc.subjectNormalityen
dc.subjectPersonhooden
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectSocial Controlen
dc.subjectSocial Problemsen
dc.subjectSocial Sciencesen
dc.subjectStigmatizationen
dc.titleStruggling Over Subjectivity: Debates About the "Self" and Alzheimer's Diseaseen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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