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dc.creatorDaugherty, Christopher K.en
dc.creatorSiegler, Marken
dc.creatorRatain, Mark J.en
dc.creatorZimmer, Georgeen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:59:19Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:59:19Zen
dc.date.created1997-06-01en
dc.date.issued1997-06-01en
dc.identifier10.7326/0003-4819-126-11-199706010-00008en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationAnnals of Internal Medicine. 1997 Jun 1; 126(11): 892-897.en
dc.identifier.issn0003-4819en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Learning+from+Our+Patients:+One+Participant's+Impact+on+Clinical+trial+Research+and+Informed+Consent&title=Annals+of+Internal+Medicine.++&volume=126&issue=11&pages=892-897&date=1997&au=Daugherty,+Christopher+K.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7326/0003-4819-126-11-199706010-00008en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/750771en
dc.description.abstractThis Perspective includes an essay on modifying phase I clinical trials, written by George Zimmer, who was a professor of English and a commentary on that essay. Professor Zimmer was a cancer patient who participated in the phase I clinical trial program at the University of Chicago. His ideas are eloquently expressed and have had a profound effect on our investigational research for anticancer agents. Although at times his suggestions may seem radical, Professor Zimmer urges us to reconsider the 50-year-old Nuremberg paradigm that participants in human research are ignorant and vulnerable and must be protected. Although we must protect patients who have life-threatening diseases from coercive inducements and misplaced hopes, we must also listen carefully and thoughtfully to our patients. This is particularly true when, as research participants in the face of sacrifice and the threat of a life-ending diagnosis, they have made the effort to express their concerns. With the effect of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome movement on clinical studies and on drug research and development, a precedent has been set that allows patients to reshape their role as participants in research trials. On a personal level, the essay by Professor Zimmer has had a significant effect on our research methods and, indeed, the focus of our research efforts. Thus, it is with a sense of respect and honor that we share George Zimmer's thoughts and our comments about the influence he has had on our research practices.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:MEDKIE/97298581en
dc.subjectAidsen
dc.subjectAttitudesen
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectAcquired Immunodeficiency Syndromeen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectClinical Trialsen
dc.subjectComprehensionen
dc.subjectControl Groupsen
dc.subjectConsenten
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.subjectDiagnosisen
dc.subjectDrugsen
dc.subjectEmpirical Researchen
dc.subjectFederal Governmenten
dc.subjectFooden
dc.subjectGovernmenten
dc.subjectHuman Experimentationen
dc.subjectInformed Consenten
dc.subjectInvestigatorsen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectMethodsen
dc.subjectMotivationen
dc.subjectPaternalismen
dc.subjectPatient Advocacyen
dc.subjectPatient Participationen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPolitical Activityen
dc.subjectRegulationen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectResearch Designen
dc.subjectResearch Subjectsen
dc.subjectRisks and Benefitsen
dc.subjectTerminally Illen
dc.subjectVulnerable Populationsen
dc.titleLearning From Our Patients: One Participant's Impact on Clinical Trial Research and Informed Consenten
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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