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dc.creatorSchneiderman, Lawrence J.en
dc.creatorJecker, Nancy S.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:01:08Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:01:08Zen
dc.date.created1996-03en
dc.date.issued1996-03en
dc.identifier10.1007/BF00489739en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationTheoretical Medicine. 1996 Mar; 17(1): 33-44.en
dc.identifier.issn0167-9902en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Should+a+Criminal+Receive+a+Heart+Transplant?+Medical+Justice+vs.++societal+Justice&title=Theoretical+Medicine.++&volume=17&issue=1&pages=33-44&date=1996&au=Schneiderman,+Lawrence+J.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00489739en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/752147en
dc.description.abstractShould the nation provide expensive care and scarce organs to convicted felons? We distinguish between two fields of justice: Medical Justice and Societal Justice. Although there is general acceptance within the medical profession that physicians may distribute limited treatments based solely on potential medical benefits without regard to nonmedical factors, that does not mean that society cannot impose limits based on societal factors. If a society considers the convicted felon to be a full member, then that person would be entitled to at least a "decent minimum" level of care - which might include access to scarce life-saving organs. However, if criminals forfeit their entitlement to the same level of medical care afforded to all members of society, they still would be entitled to a kind of "rudimentary decent minimum" granted to all persons on simple humanitarian grounds. Almost certainly this entitlement would not include access to organ transplants.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/51376en
dc.subjectBeneficenceen
dc.subjectBiomedical Technologiesen
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectHeartsen
dc.subjectJusticeen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectMoral Obligationsen
dc.subjectObligations of Societyen
dc.subjectOrgan Transplantationen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectPrisonersen
dc.subjectPrognosisen
dc.subjectResource Allocationen
dc.subjectRightsen
dc.subjectScarcityen
dc.subjectSelection for Treatmenten
dc.subjectSocial worthen
dc.subjectStandardsen
dc.subjectTissue Transplantationen
dc.subjectTransplant Recipientsen
dc.subjectTransplantationen
dc.subjectValuesen
dc.titleShould a Criminal Receive a Heart Transplant? Medical Justice vs. Societal Justiceen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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