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dc.creatorCamenisch, P.F.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:01:13Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:01:13Zen
dc.date.created1996-02en
dc.date.issued1996-02en
dc.identifier10.1177/00220345960750021501en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Dental Research. 1996 Feb; 75(2): 825-831.en
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=The+Moral+Foundations+of+Scientific+Ethics+and+Responsibility&title=Journal+of+Dental+Research.++&volume=75&issue=2&pages=825-831&date=1996&au=Camenisch,+P.F.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/00220345960750021501en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/752284en
dc.description.abstractAny significant involvement of AADR/IADR in ensuring responsible research among their members must be grounded in a widely accepted consensus that there are good moral reasons for such involvement. One important source of such reasons is AADR/IADR's identity as a scientific research, a professional, and a dental association. These identities and the commitments to society and to clients implicit in them generate several mutually reinforcing reasons for taking responsibility for the reliability of members' research. With regard to scientific research, these reasons arise from what it means to do such research, and from the various ways the larger society supports that activity. With regard to the professional dimension, the reasons arise from what it means to be a profession in this society and can be best seen in relation to the four major characteristics of professions. With regard to AADR/IADR's being a dental profession, such reasons arise from dental researchers' specific role in the dental family of professions' goal of delivering optimal care to the clients of practitioners. The clients' perspective, specifically the need to be able to trust that one will receive the best care possible, is a final source for such reasons. Two current issues, the sharing of findings and commercial/industrial support for research, give new urgency to this question of the Association's role in ensuring responsible research.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:MEDKIE/96240522en
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectBiomedical Researchen
dc.subjectCodes of Ethicsen
dc.subjectCommon Gooden
dc.subjectCompetenceen
dc.subjectConsensusen
dc.subjectDentistryen
dc.subjectDisclosureen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectFrauden
dc.subjectGoalsen
dc.subjectInformation Disseminationen
dc.subjectInvestigatorsen
dc.subjectMisconducten
dc.subjectMoral Obligationsen
dc.subjectObligations to Societyen
dc.subjectOrganizationsen
dc.subjectProfessional Autonomyen
dc.subjectProfessional Competenceen
dc.subjectProfessional Ethicsen
dc.subjectProfessional Organizationsen
dc.subjectProfessional Roleen
dc.subjectRegulationen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectResearchersen
dc.subjectScienceen
dc.subjectSelf Regulationen
dc.subjectTrusten
dc.subjectValuesen
dc.titleThe Moral Foundations of Scientific Ethics and Responsibilityen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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