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dc.creatorLawson, Karenen
dc.creatorWiggins, Sandien
dc.creatorGreen, Tiffinieen
dc.creatorAdam, Shelinen
dc.creatorBloch, Mauriceen
dc.creatorHayden, Michael R.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:01:16Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:01:16Zen
dc.date.created1996-10en
dc.date.issued1996-10en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Medical Genetics. 1996 Oct; 33(10): 856-862.en
dc.identifier.issn0022-2593en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Adverse+Psychological+Events+Occurring+in+the+First+Year+After+predictive+Testing+for+Huntington's+Disease&title=Journal+of+Medical+Genetics.++&volume=33&issue=10&pages=856-862&date=1996&au=Lawson,+Karenen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/752352en
dc.description.abstractA total of 135 participants in the Canadian predictive testing programme for HD were followed for at least one year in one of four study groups: increased risk (n = 37), decreased risk ( n = 58), uninformative (n = 17), or not tested (n = 23). Clinical criteria for an adverse event were a suicide attempt or formulation of a suicide attempt plan, psychiatric hospitalisation, depression lasting longer than two months, a marked increase in substance abuse, and the breakdown of important relationships. Quantitative criteria, as measured by changes on the General Severity Index of the Symptom Checklist 90-R and the Beck Depression Inventory, were also used to identify people who had adverse events. Twenty of the 135 participants (14.8%) had an adverse event. There were no significant differences between those with or without an adverse event with respect to age, sex, marital status, education, psychiatric history, general psychiatric distress, or social supports at baseline. However, evidence for depression was associated with an increased frequency of adverse events (p less than 0.04). The adverse events were similar and seen with equivalent frequency in those receiving an increased risk or decreased risk and persons at risk who did not receive a modification of risk. However, a significant difference was found in the timing of adverse events for the increased and decreased risk groups (p less than 0.0002). In the increased risk group all of the adverse events occurred within 10 days after results whereas, in the decreased risk group, all of the adverse events occurred six months or later after reviewing test results. These results suggest that people entering into predictive testing with some evidence of clinical depression warrant special vigilance and also suggest that counselling and support should be available for all participants in predictive testing irrespective of the direction of test results.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherCanadian Collaborative Study of Predictive Testingen
dc.sourceBRL:MEDKIE/97087338en
dc.subjectCounselingen
dc.subjectDepressive Disorderen
dc.subjectDisclosureen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectEvaluationen
dc.subjectEvaluation Studiesen
dc.subjectGenetic Counselingen
dc.subjectGenetic Screeningen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHuntington Diseaseen
dc.subjectMental Healthen
dc.subjectPsychological Stressen
dc.subjectRisken
dc.subjectRisks and Benefitsen
dc.subjectSuicideen
dc.subjectTime Factorsen
dc.subjectTruth Disclosureen
dc.subjectUncertaintyen
dc.titleAdverse Psychological Events Occurring in the First Year After Predictive Testing for Huntington's Diseaseen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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