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dc.creatorRussell, Stevenen
dc.creatorGilson, Lucyen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:01:28Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:01:28Zen
dc.date.created1997en
dc.date.issued1997en
dc.identifier10.2190/YHL2-F0EA-JW1M-DHEJen
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationInternational Journal of Health Services. 1997; 27(2): 359-379.en
dc.identifier.issn0020-7314en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=User+Fee+Policies+to+Promote+Health+Service+Access+for+the+Poor:+A+wolf+in+Sheep's+Clothing?&title=International+Journal+of+Health+Services.++&volume=27&issue=2&pages=359-379&date=1997&au=Russell,+Stevenen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.2190/YHL2-F0EA-JW1M-DHEJen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/752659en
dc.description.abstractAn international survey of health service user fee and exemption policies in 26 low- and middle-income countries assessed whether user fee policies were supported by measures that protect the poor. In particular, it explored whether governments were introducing a package of supportive measures to promote service improvements that benefit disadvantaged groups and tackle differential ability to pay through an effective series of exemptions. The results show that many countries lack policies that promote access for disadvantaged groups within user fee systems and quality improvements such as revenue retention at the health care facility and expenditure guidelines for local managers. More significant policy failures were identified for exemptions: 27 percent of countries had no policy to exempt the poor; in contrast, health workers were exempted in 50 percent of countries. Even when an official policy to exempt the poor existed, there were numerous informational, administrative, economic, and political constraints to effective implementation of these exemptions. The authors argue that user fee policy should be developed more cautiously and in a more informed environment. Fees are likely to exacerbate existing inequities in health care financing unless exemptions policy can effectively reach those unable to pay.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:MEDKIE/97287515en
dc.subjectDeveloping Countriesen
dc.subjectDiscriminationen
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectEnvironmenten
dc.subjectEvaluationen
dc.subjectEvaluation Studiesen
dc.subjectGoalsen
dc.subjectGuidelinesen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectIndigentsen
dc.subjectInternational Aspectsen
dc.subjectMedical Feesen
dc.subjectManagersen
dc.subjectPublic Healthen
dc.subjectPublic Policyen
dc.subjectPublic Sectoren
dc.subjectResource Allocationen
dc.subjectSocial Discriminationen
dc.subjectSurveyen
dc.titleUser Fee Policies to Promote Health Service Access for the Poor: A Wolf in Sheep's Clothing?en
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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