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dc.creatorElliott, Thomas E.en
dc.creatorMurray, David M.en
dc.creatorElliott, Barbara A.en
dc.creatorBraun, Barbaraen
dc.creatorOken, Martin M.en
dc.creatorJohnson, Karen M.en
dc.creatorPost-White, Janiceen
dc.creatorLichtblau, Leonarden
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:02:15Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:02:15Zen
dc.date.created1995-10en
dc.date.issued1995-10en
dc.identifier10.1016/0885-3924(95)00100-Den
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Pain and Symptom Management. 1995 Oct; 10(7): 494-504.en
dc.identifier.issn0885-3924en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Physician+Knowledge+and+Attitudes+about+Cancer+Pain+Management:+A+survey+from+the+Minnesota+Cancer+Pain+Project&title=Journal+of+Pain+and+Symptom+Management.++&volume=10&issue=7&pages=494-504&date=1995&au=Elliott,+Thomas+E.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0885-3924(95)00100-Den
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/753254en
dc.description.abstractThe purposes of the study were to determine the knowledge and attitudes about cancer pain management (CPM) among practicing physicians in six Minnesota communities and to determine the physician-related barriers to optimal CPM. Eligible community physicians were surveyed by telephone. The study analyzed responses of 145 physicians (response rate, 87%). The majority of the physicians were primary care specialists (73%). Significant knowledge deficits were identified in nine of 14 CPM principles, but inappropriate attitudes were found in only two of nine CPM concepts. Medical specialty had the strongest influence on knowledge and attitudes, with primary care physicians having significantly better outcomes than surgeons or medical subspecialists. Effective education strategies must address knowledge deficits, attitudes, and motivations of the relevant peer group influencing physicians, as well as those of individual physicians. The Minnesota Cancer Pain Project is testing strategies to enhance CPM by physicians and improve patient outcomes.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:MEDKIE/96072126en
dc.subjectAttitudesen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectCompetenceen
dc.subjectDrugsen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectEvaluationen
dc.subjectEvaluation Studiesen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectKnowledgeen
dc.subjectMedical Specialtiesen
dc.subjectPainen
dc.subjectPalliative Careen
dc.subjectPatient Careen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectPrimary Health Careen
dc.subjectProfessional Competenceen
dc.subjectSurveyen
dc.titlePhysician Knowledge and Attitudes About Cancer Pain Management: A Survey From the Minnesota Cancer Pain Projecten
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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