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dc.creatorKelly, Brian J.en
dc.creatorVarghese, Francis T.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:02:27Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:02:27Zen
dc.date.created1996-02en
dc.date.issued1996-02en
dc.identifier10.3109/00048679609076068en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry. 1996 Feb; 30(1): 3-8.en
dc.identifier.issn0004-8674en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Assisted+Suicide+and+Euthanasia:+What+about+the+Clinical+Issues?&title=Australian+and+New+Zealand+Journal+of+Psychiatry.++&volume=30&issue=1&pages=3-8&date=1996&au=Kelly,+Brian+J.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00048679609076068en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/753615en
dc.description.abstractThis paper aims to address the clinical issues involved in a patient's request for assisted suicide. The psychiatric and broader psychosocial issues for the dying patient, their family and their treating doctor have been largely unaddressed in the debate concerning euthanasia to date. A range of the clinical issues that need to be incorporated in the ethical and legal considerations are reviewed. The reasons for a patient seeking suicide as a treatment are complex and go beyond questions of a patient's right to die. The request for euthanasia needs to be seen in the context of the patient's circumstances, including relationships with and attitudes of carers and health professionals, along with patterns of psychiatric disorder and psychiatric symptoms in the medically ill. The clinical issues involve not only the diagnosis or management of psychiatric disorder but also the acknowledgment of the factors influencing an individual's adjustment to the threat of illness and death. The dynamics of family interactions and doctor-patient relationships in this setting are factors that may impinge upon a request for assistance to die. These factors may be more important than the severity of a person's illness or their quality of life, and are less likely to be recognised and addressed in situations of professional isolation. There are critical issues facing psychiatry in new legislative developments.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:MEDKIE/96314151en
dc.subjectActive Euthanasiaen
dc.subjectAidsen
dc.subjectAssisted Suicideen
dc.subjectAttitudesen
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectDeathen
dc.subjectDiagnosisen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectEuthanasiaen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectIllnessen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectMedical Educationen
dc.subjectPalliative Careen
dc.subjectPsychiatric Diagnosisen
dc.subjectPsychiatryen
dc.subjectQuality of Lifeen
dc.subjectRight to Dieen
dc.subjectSufferingen
dc.subjectSuicideen
dc.subjectTerminal Careen
dc.subjectTerminally Illen
dc.titleAssisted Suicide and Euthanasia: What About the Clinical Issues?en
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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