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dc.creatorAckerman, Terrence F.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:03:09Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:03:09Zen
dc.date.created1996en
dc.date.issued1996en
dc.identifier10.1300/J069v15n02_03en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Addictive Diseases. 1996; 15(2): 25-42.en
dc.identifier.issn1055-0887en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Chemically+Dependent+Physicians+and+Informed+Consent+Disclosure&title=Journal+of+Addictive+Diseases.++&volume=15&issue=2&pages=25-42&date=1996&au=Ackerman,+Terrence+F.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J069v15n02_03en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/754244en
dc.description.abstractDevelopments in law, professional guidelines, and public attitudes support informed consent disclosure by physicians who have been treated for chemical dependency. This view is built on the apparent materiality of the risk of relapse to informed treatment decisions by patients. Several considerations undercut this position. The probability is remote that a patient will be injured by a recovering physician who suffers an undetected relapse while being properly monitored. Monitoring by impaired physicians programs provides a more sensitive and specific mechanism for detecting relapsed physicians. Moreover, compromise of the privacy and employment rights of recovering physicians by consent disclosure is not justified if programs provide rigorous monitoring that protects the welfare of patients. Finally, required consent disclosure will reduce referrals of chemically dependent physicians to impaired physicians programs, thereby increasing the danger to patients. Limiting demands for required consent disclosure necessitates effective operation of impaired physicians programs.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:MEDKIE/96271571en
dc.subjectAlcohol Abuseen
dc.subjectAttitudesen
dc.subjectCompetenceen
dc.subjectConfidentialityen
dc.subjectConsenten
dc.subjectDisclosureen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.subjectDrug Abuseen
dc.subjectEmploymenten
dc.subjectFederal Governmenten
dc.subjectGovernmenten
dc.subjectGuidelinesen
dc.subjectHIV Seropositivityen
dc.subjectInformed Consenten
dc.subjectInjuriesen
dc.subjectLawen
dc.subjectLegal Aspectsen
dc.subjectLegal Liabilityen
dc.subjectLegal Obligationsen
dc.subjectLiabilityen
dc.subjectOrganizational Policiesen
dc.subjectOrganizationsen
dc.subjectPatient Careen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectPrivacyen
dc.subjectProbabilityen
dc.subjectProfessional Competenceen
dc.subjectProfessional Organizationsen
dc.subjectPublic Opinionen
dc.subjectRegulationen
dc.subjectRehabilitationen
dc.subjectRightsen
dc.subjectRisken
dc.subjectSelf Regulationen
dc.titleChemically Dependent Physicians and Informed Consent Disclosureen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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