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dc.creatorEngelhardt, H. Tristramen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:04:10Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:04:10Zen
dc.date.created1998-08en
dc.date.issued1998-08en
dc.identifier10.1076/chbi.4.2.143.6908en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationChristian Bioethics. 1998 Aug; 4(2): 143-167.en
dc.identifier.issn1380-3603en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Physician-Assisted+Suicide+Reconsidered:+Dying+as+a+Christian+in+A+post-Christian+Age&title=Christian+Bioethics.++&volume=4&issue=2&pages=143-167&date=1998&au=Engelhardt,+H.+Tristramen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1076/chbi.4.2.143.6908en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/754796en
dc.description.abstractThe traditional Christian focus concerning dying is on repentance, not dignity. The goal of a traditional Christian death is not a pleasing, final chapter to life, but union with God: holiness. The pursuit of holiness requires putting on Christ and accepting His cross. In contrast, post-traditional Christian and secular concerns with self-determination, control, dignity, and self-esteem make physician-assisted suicide and voluntary active euthanasia plausible moral choices. Such is not the case within the context of the traditional Christian experience of God, which throughout its 2000 years has sternly condemned suicide and assisted suicide. The wrongness of such actions cannot adequately be appreciated outside the experience of that Christian life. Traditional Christian appreciations of death involve an epistemology and metaphysics of values in discordance with those of secular morality. This difference in the appreciation of the meaning of dying and death, as well as in the appreciation of the moral significance of suicide, discloses a new battle in the culture wars separating traditional Christian morality from that of the surrounding society.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/61159en
dc.subjectActive Euthanasiaen
dc.subjectAssisted Suicideen
dc.subjectAttitudesen
dc.subjectAttitudes to Deathen
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectChristian Ethicsen
dc.subjectCultureen
dc.subjectDeathen
dc.subjectEastern Orthodox Ethicsen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectEuthanasiaen
dc.subjectFreedomen
dc.subjectLegal Aspectsen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectMoralityen
dc.subjectMetaphysicsen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectPostmodernismen
dc.subjectRight to Dieen
dc.subjectSecularismen
dc.subjectSufferingen
dc.subjectSuicideen
dc.subjectTheologyen
dc.subjectTrendsen
dc.subjectValuesen
dc.subjectVoluntary Euthanasiaen
dc.titlePhysician-Assisted Suicide Reconsidered: Dying as a Christian in a Post-Christian Ageen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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