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dc.creatorKissane, David W.en
dc.creatorStreet, Annetteen
dc.creatorNitschke, Philipen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:04:12Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:04:12Zen
dc.date.created1998-10-03en
dc.date.issued1998-10-03en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationLancet. 1998 Oct 3; 352(9134): 1097-1102.en
dc.identifier.issn0023-7507en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Seven+Deaths+in+Darwin:+Case+Studies+under+the+Rights+of+The+terminally+Ill+Act,+Northern+Territory,+Australia&title=Lancet.++&volume=352&issue=9134&pages=1097-1102&date=1998&au=Kissane,+David+W.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/754834en
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: During the 9 months between July, 1996, and March, 1997, the provision of euthanasia for the terminally ill was legal in the Northern Territory of Australia. Seven patients made formal use of the Rights of the Terminally Ill (ROTI) Act; four died under the Act. We report their clinical details and the decision-making process required by the Act. METHODS: We taped in-depth interviews with the general practitioner who provided euthanasia. Further information was available from public texts created by patients, the media, and the coroner. FINDINGS: All seven patients had cancer, most at advanced stages. Three were socially isolated. Symptoms of depression were common. Having met criteria of the Act, some patients deferred their decision for a time before proceeding with euthanasia. Medical opinions about the terminal nature of illness differed. INTERPRETATION: Provision of opinions about the terminal nature of illness and the mental health of the patient, as required by the ROTI Act, created problematic gatekeeping roles for the doctors involved.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:MEDKIE/99012929en
dc.subjectAssisted Suicideen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectCase Studiesen
dc.subjectCompetenceen
dc.subjectConsultationen
dc.subjectDepressive Disorderen
dc.subjectDiagnosisen
dc.subjectDoctorsen
dc.subjectEuthanasiaen
dc.subjectEvaluationen
dc.subjectFamily Relationshipen
dc.subjectGatekeepingen
dc.subjectGuideline Adherenceen
dc.subjectGuidelinesen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectInterviewsen
dc.subjectIllnessen
dc.subjectLegislationen
dc.subjectMental Healthen
dc.subjectMethodsen
dc.subjectNatureen
dc.subjectPalliative Careen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPhysician's Roleen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectPrognosisen
dc.subjectPsychiatric Diagnosisen
dc.subjectPsychiatryen
dc.subjectQualitative Researchen
dc.subjectReferral and Consultationen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectRight to Dieen
dc.subjectRightsen
dc.subjectSocial Interactionen
dc.subjectSufferingen
dc.subjectSuicideen
dc.subjectTerminally Illen
dc.subjectTreatment Refusalen
dc.subjectUncertaintyen
dc.subjectVoluntary Euthanasiaen
dc.titleSeven Deaths in Darwin: Case Studies Under the Rights of the Terminally Ill Act, Northern Territory, Australiaen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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