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dc.creatorGabbard, Glen O.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:04:20Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:04:20Zen
dc.date.created1996en
dc.date.issued1996en
dc.identifier10.3109/00048679709073839en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationAmerican Journal of Psychotherapy. 1996 Summer; 50(3): 311-322.en
dc.identifier.issn0002-9564en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Lessons+to+Be+Learned+from+the+Study+of+Sexual+Boundary+violations&title=American+Journal+of+Psychotherapy.++&volume=50&issue=3&pages=311-322&date=1996&au=Gabbard,+Glen+O.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00048679709073839en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/755007en
dc.description.abstractThe study of sexual boundary violations, through the actual evaluation and treatment of therapists who have engaged in sexual misconduct, reveals that all of us are potentially vulnerable to violations of this nature. A number of lessons can be learned from the detailed examination of these cases. These lessons include the following: (1) There is a difference between the conscious and unconscious intent of the therapist. (2) "Love" in the therapeutic setting is fraught with problems, including the fact that it is often used as a defense against the therapist's own aggression. (3) Supportive therapy and boundaryless therapy often become confused when a therapist switches from an expressive to a supportive approach. (4) The thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that a therapist would most like to keep secret from a supervisor or consultant are the most important issues to discuss with that supervisor or consultant. These observations have a number of implications for prevention. Matters of technique are inevitably conflated with issues of ethical principles so that the teaching of ethics must include discussions of transference, countertransference, and the use of third parties, such as supervisors or consultants, to assist the therapist in the monitoring of professional boundaries.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:MEDKIE/97040941en
dc.subjectAggressionen
dc.subjectConsultationen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectEvaluationen
dc.subjectFrauden
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Personnelen
dc.subjectIntentionen
dc.subjectLoveen
dc.subjectMisconducten
dc.subjectNatureen
dc.subjectPrivacyen
dc.subjectProfessional Patient Relationshipen
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen
dc.subjectReferral and Consultationen
dc.subjectRegulationen
dc.subjectSelf Regulationen
dc.subjectSex Offensesen
dc.subjectSexualityen
dc.titleLessons to Be Learned From the Study of Sexual Boundary Violationsen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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