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dc.creatorVeatch, Robert M.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:08:33Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:08:33Zen
dc.date.created1997-12en
dc.date.issued1997-12en
dc.identifier10.1353/ken.1997.0041en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationKennedy Institute of Ethics Journal. 1997 Dec; 7(4): 391-401.en
dc.identifier.issn1054-6863en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Who+Should+Manage+Care?+the+Case+for+Patients&title=Kennedy+Institute+of+Ethics+Journal.++&volume=7&issue=4&pages=391-401&date=1997&au=Veatch,+Robert+M.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1353/ken.1997.0041en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/756878en
dc.description.abstractAfter establishing that it is essential that health care be rationed in some fashion, the paper examines the arguments for and against clinicians as gatekeepers. It first argues that bedside clinicians do not have the information needed to make allocation decisions. Then it claims that physicians at the bedside can be expected to make the wrong choice for two reasons: their commitment to the Hippocratic ethic forces them to pursue the patient's best interest (even when resources will produce only very marginal benefit and could do much more good elsewhere) and their values will lead them to calculate the net value of treatments incorrectly. Alternative decision makers are considered. It is argued that both groups of physicians and administrators will also make allocations incorrectly and that leaving the allocation decisions to patients themselves is the best approach. Mechanisms for fair and efficient rationing by patients at the societal and individual level are examined.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/59022en
dc.subjectAccountabilityen
dc.subjectAdministratorsen
dc.subjectBeneficenceen
dc.subjectConflict of Interesten
dc.subjectCosts and Benefitsen
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectGatekeepingen
dc.subjectGoalsen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectHealth Promotionen
dc.subjectInstitutional Policiesen
dc.subjectJusticeen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subjectManaged Careen
dc.subjectObligations to Societyen
dc.subjectPatient Advocacyen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPhysician's Roleen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectProlongation of Lifeen
dc.subjectPublic Policyen
dc.subjectQuality of Health Careen
dc.subjectQuality of Lifeen
dc.subjectResource Allocationen
dc.subjectScarcityen
dc.subjectTreatment Outcomeen
dc.subjectUtilitarianismen
dc.subjectValue of Lifeen
dc.subjectValuesen
dc.titleWho Should Manage Care? the Case for Patientsen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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